Nature to the Rescue
by F.M. Kearney | August 24, 2016

Copyright F.M. KearneyI’ve always viewed myself as a “traditionalist.” I’ve never really strayed too far away from the boundaries of straight photography. It’s not that I have anything against digital manipulations, it’s just that I’m not an expert at it. I consider my Photoshop skills to be intermediat...

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Capturing Motion in Birds
by Nikhil Bahl | January 22, 2016

Copyright Nikhil BahlUsing a longer exposure to capture motion is very common when photographing waterfalls, although, this technique is not used as often when photographing birds. After repeatedly photographing a species, using this technique allows me to create different images from the ones I have already capture...

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Are You Image Driven or Subject Driven?
by Nikhil Bahl | November 3, 2015

Copyright Nikhil BahlWhen I began shooting RAW files, the processing tools available were somewhat rudimentary. I labored with the early Adobe Camera RAW converter to process my files (Lightroom didn’t exist then), but often felt I could not get the final images to look exactly the way I envisioned them. Part...

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The 4 Angles of Success
by Steven Blandin | June 22, 2015

When teaching photography workshops, I often get asked to discuss the most impactful techniques needed to create excellent wildlife photography. I often tell them about the four angles of success: a triangulation of the sun angle, height angle, head angle and background angle.

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The Rosette Nebula
by Chris White | March 16, 2015

Although I’m not an astrophotography expert, I recently posted this image under the landscapes image forum on NatureScapes.Net and was asked to describe how the image was created. As I sat down to write, I realized a little more depth on my experience would best convey how I stumbled through...

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Background Control in Closeup Photography
by Tom Whelan | February 5, 2015

A 100mm macro lens is a classic choice for closeup work. It’s the first macro lens many photographers use. It’s great handheld or on a tripod, and there are versions from different manufacturers with excellent sharpness and bokeh. But for a number of subjects, such as medium-sized flower...

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Shooting for the Moon
by Tim Grey | December 29, 2014

I think it is fair to say that most people have been—at one time or another—fascinated with the moon in the sky above. And of course, as a photographer there’s a good chance you’ve considered including the moon in a photograph from time to time. Along the way, perhaps you’ve experience...

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Using Position in Wildlife Photography
by Steve Schwartzman | December 19, 2014

The three most important things in real estate are location, location, location. In wildlife photography, they are position, position, position. As a nature photographer specializing in plants, I offer some suggestions on using position to your advantage when creating your work.

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The Fish-eye Lens In Landscape Photography
by E.J. Peiker | October 22, 2014

The novelty fish-eye lens has long allowed photographers to explore a unique look and perspective in their picture-taking endeavors. Invented more than 100 years ago, the ultra-wide angle lens has a 180-degree angle of view and produces a hemispherical rather than the linear view that normal rec...

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Avoiding Black Backgrounds for Macro Photography
by Greg Basco | October 2, 2014

Using black backgrounds is a divisive issue in nature photography; people tend either to love them or hate them. I’m more selective. I quite like black backgrounds for nocturnal animals as they give a totally natural look. I’ve had people tell me, for instance, that they prefer red-eyed tree...

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