fbpixel

Moderators: Greg Downing, E.J. Peiker

All times are UTC - 5 hours

  
« Previous topic | Next topic »  
Reply to topic  
 First unread post  | 12 posts | 
by pdschu on Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:55 pm
User avatar
pdschu
Forum Contributor
Posts: 164
Joined: 23 Mar 2009
Location: Orlando, Florida
What difference is there in using the "Z" lenses vs Nikon lenses with adapter? Is there any loss of image quality, etc?
Paul Schumacher
Schumacher Photography
 

by E.J. Peiker on Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:20 pm
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 85274
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
The Z lenses are across the board much better due primarily to the straighter light path to the sensor enabled by the much wider mount, as well as that they are all much newer designs.  So, IQ is better with every Z lens than it is with it's F-mount equivalent.  Additionally, AF will be faster.  That's not to say that you can't get good results using F-mount lenses via the adapter but for equivalent lenses, the Zs will be better.  The wider the lens, the more noticeable it will be due to the straighter lightpath.  For example if I were buying a Z system but could only get 2 of the 3 "trinity" lenses (14-28 or 16-35, 24-70, and 70-200), I would get the Z version of the wide and standard lens and use the F-mount 70-200 until I could replace it at a later date.  Hope that helps.
 

by mlgray12 on Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:38 pm
User avatar
mlgray12
Lifetime Member
Posts: 1670
Joined: 17 Oct 2007
Location: Fort Davis, Texas
Member #:01023
I have already bought all of the Z lens in the s-line of f/2.8 lens - I love them all and the are better than the f-mount lens I used to use
Really like the ability to change the f/stop or exposure compensation with the additional ring on lens
For the most part they are also lighter than the f-mount versions -
Now my only decision is do I keep my last D850 - I am selling one as we speak or do I trade it in on the new Z7 II - from some of the stuff I have seen on the Nikon creators videos - looks like they may hve done some nice improvements in focusing which I still like my D850 over my Z7 especially for BIF. But for now I am waiting for some better hands on testing by other photographers directly addressing things like BIF
I do use my 500mm f/5.8 PF on the Z7 with an adapter and with my 1.4 TC - started even trying my old TC 17X which I quit using with my D850 due to image quality - image quality I think is improved using the 1.4x with the 500 PF on the Z7 over the D850
Michael L. Gray
Wildlife and Conservation Bum
 

by E.J. Peiker on Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:50 pm
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 85274
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
mlgray12 wrote:
image quality I think is  improved using the 1.4x with the 500 PF on the  Z7 over the D850


That is due to the fact that you are using the sensor to do AF rather than an off sensor AF system in your D850 which is really only dead accurate at whatever distance, temperature, and light source that you did your AF Fine tune with (assuming that you did calibrate it).  If you didn't calibrate the lens to your DSLR, then there is almost 0 percent probability that it is as accurate as can be.  I have literally done hundreds of 500PF lenses with D4/D5, D850 and D500 cameras and exactly zero of them required no AFFT value change.
 

by mlgray12 on Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:37 pm
User avatar
mlgray12
Lifetime Member
Posts: 1670
Joined: 17 Oct 2007
Location: Fort Davis, Texas
Member #:01023
E.J. Peiker wrote:
mlgray12 wrote:
image quality I think is  improved using the 1.4x with the 500 PF on the  Z7 over the D850


That is due to the fact that you are using the sensor to do AF rather than an off sensor AF system in your D850 which is really only dead accurate at whatever distance, temperature, and light source that you did your AF Fine tune with (assuming that you did calibrate it).  If you didn't calibrate the lens to your DSLR, then there is almost 0 percent probability that it is as accurate as can be.  I have literally done hundreds of 500PF lenses with D4/D5, D850 and D500 cameras and exactly zero of them required no AFFT value change.


EJ - thanks I actually have all the gear to fine tune my lens but in this case I did not - just being lazy - I should have mentioned that - my 500 seems to be pretty accurate without Tc's and I saw same thing with all my older big glass like the 600 f/4 and 400 f/2.8 always needing to do lots more correction with TC's
That is another reason really like mirrorless - Is there any reason to actually fine tune when using a mirrorless camera like a Z7 - They still have that capability which not sure what it corrects when focusing is done on sensor
Mike
Michael L. Gray
Wildlife and Conservation Bum
 

by E.J. Peiker on Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:49 pm
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 85274
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
mlgray12 wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
mlgray12 wrote:
image quality I think is  improved using the 1.4x with the 500 PF on the  Z7 over the D850


That is due to the fact that you are using the sensor to do AF rather than an off sensor AF system in your D850 which is really only dead accurate at whatever distance, temperature, and light source that you did your AF Fine tune with (assuming that you did calibrate it).  If you didn't calibrate the lens to your DSLR, then there is almost 0 percent probability that it is as accurate as can be.  I have literally done hundreds of 500PF lenses with D4/D5, D850 and D500 cameras and exactly zero of them required no AFFT value change.


EJ - thanks I actually have all the gear to fine tune my lens but in this case I did not - just being lazy - I should have mentioned that - my 500 seems to be pretty accurate without Tc's and I saw same thing with all my older big glass like the 600 f/4 and 400 f/2.8 always needing to do lots more correction with TC's
That is another reason really like mirrorless - Is there any reason to actually fine tune when using a mirrorless camera like a Z7 - They still have that capability which not sure what it corrects when focusing is done on sensor
Mike

No point at all in doing the fine tune on a mirrorless camera unless you purposely want to force a lens to front or back focus for some reason.  Do they even have AFFT in the menus on the Z cameras?  I don't have one to check.
 

by Brian K. on Sat Nov 21, 2020 7:54 am
User avatar
Brian K.
Lifetime Member
Posts: 898
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: Virginia
Member #:00115
E.J. Peiker wrote:
The Z lenses are across the board much better due primarily to the straighter light path to the sensor enabled by the much wider mount, as well as that they are all much newer designs.  So, IQ is better with every Z lens than it is with it's F-mount equivalent.  Additionally, AF will be faster.  That's not to say that you can't get good results using F-mount lenses via the adapter but for equivalent lenses, the Zs will be better.  The wider the lens, the more noticeable it will be due to the straighter lightpath.  For example if I were buying a Z system but could only get 2 of the 3 "trinity" lenses (14-28 or 16-35, 24-70, and 70-200), I would get the Z version of the wide and standard lens and use the F-mount 70-200 until I could replace it at a later date.  Hope that helps.


E.J.,

This is very interesting. Would you say this is generally true for all new, larger mounts like the Canon RF mount? 

Brian
Brian D. Kennedy
NSN 0115
http://www.bdkennedy.com
 

by mlgray12 on Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:21 am
User avatar
mlgray12
Lifetime Member
Posts: 1670
Joined: 17 Oct 2007
Location: Fort Davis, Texas
Member #:01023
E.J. Peiker wrote:
mlgray12 wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
mlgray12 wrote:
image quality I think is  improved using the 1.4x with the 500 PF on the  Z7 over the D850


That is due to the fact that you are using the sensor to do AF rather than an off sensor AF system in your D850 which is really only dead accurate at whatever distance, temperature, and light source that you did your AF Fine tune with (assuming that you did calibrate it).  If you didn't calibrate the lens to your DSLR, then there is almost 0 percent probability that it is as accurate as can be.  I have literally done hundreds of 500PF lenses with D4/D5, D850 and D500 cameras and exactly zero of them required no AFFT value change.


EJ - thanks I actually have all the gear to fine tune my lens but in this case I did not - just being lazy - I should have mentioned that - my 500 seems to be pretty accurate without Tc's and I saw same thing with all my older big glass like the 600 f/4 and 400 f/2.8 always needing to do lots more correction with TC's
That is another reason really like mirrorless - Is there any reason to actually fine tune when using a mirrorless camera like a Z7 - They still have that capability which not sure what it corrects when focusing is done on sensor
Mike

No point at all in doing the fine tune on a mirrorless camera unless you purposely want to force a lens to front or back focus for some reason.  Do they even have AFFT in the menus on the Z cameras?  I don't have one to check.


I thought I had seen it on menu but I went and checked the camera to be sure and at least the Z7 has a AFFT on the menu 
Michael L. Gray
Wildlife and Conservation Bum
 

by E.J. Peiker on Sat Nov 21, 2020 1:17 pm
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 85274
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
Brian K. wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
The Z lenses are across the board much better due primarily to the straighter light path to the sensor enabled by the much wider mount, as well as that they are all much newer designs.  So, IQ is better with every Z lens than it is with it's F-mount equivalent.  Additionally, AF will be faster.  That's not to say that you can't get good results using F-mount lenses via the adapter but for equivalent lenses, the Zs will be better.  The wider the lens, the more noticeable it will be due to the straighter lightpath.  For example if I were buying a Z system but could only get 2 of the 3 "trinity" lenses (14-28 or 16-35, 24-70, and 70-200), I would get the Z version of the wide and standard lens and use the F-mount 70-200 until I could replace it at a later date.  Hope that helps.


E.J.,

This is very interesting. Would you say this is generally true for all new, larger mounts like the Canon RF mount? 

Brian

Yes, absolutely, the Canon RF lenses blow the doors off of the equivalent EF lenses.
 

by ricardo00 on Sat Nov 21, 2020 3:57 pm
ricardo00
Forum Contributor
Posts: 211
Joined: 06 Apr 2014
E.J. Peiker wrote:
Brian K. wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
The Z lenses are across the board much better due primarily to the straighter light path to the sensor enabled by the much wider mount, as well as that they are all much newer designs.  So, IQ is better with every Z lens than it is with it's F-mount equivalent.  Additionally, AF will be faster.  That's not to say that you can't get good results using F-mount lenses via the adapter but for equivalent lenses, the Zs will be better.  The wider the lens, the more noticeable it will be due to the straighter lightpath.  For example if I were buying a Z system but could only get 2 of the 3 "trinity" lenses (14-28 or 16-35, 24-70, and 70-200), I would get the Z version of the wide and standard lens and use the F-mount 70-200 until I could replace it at a later date.  Hope that helps.


E.J.,

This is very interesting. Would you say this is generally true for all new, larger mounts like the Canon RF mount? 

Brian

Yes, absolutely, the Canon RF lenses blow the doors off of the equivalent EF lenses.


    Interesting.  So not to get too far off topic, but is it the ratio of the width of the mount to the size of the sensor?  That is, if one has a smaller sensor (thinking DX for Nikon or even a micro-thirds camera), then the smaller mount is better relatively to the same size mount on a the larger sensor?
 

by Brian K. on Sat Nov 21, 2020 5:21 pm
User avatar
Brian K.
Lifetime Member
Posts: 898
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: Virginia
Member #:00115
E.J. Peiker wrote:
Brian K. wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
The Z lenses are across the board much better due primarily to the straighter light path to the sensor enabled by the much wider mount, as well as that they are all much newer designs.  So, IQ is better with every Z lens than it is with it's F-mount equivalent.  Additionally, AF will be faster.  That's not to say that you can't get good results using F-mount lenses via the adapter but for equivalent lenses, the Zs will be better.  The wider the lens, the more noticeable it will be due to the straighter lightpath.  For example if I were buying a Z system but could only get 2 of the 3 "trinity" lenses (14-28 or 16-35, 24-70, and 70-200), I would get the Z version of the wide and standard lens and use the F-mount 70-200 until I could replace it at a later date.  Hope that helps.


E.J.,

This is very interesting. Would you say this is generally true for all new, larger mounts like the Canon RF mount? 

Brian

Yes, absolutely, the Canon RF lenses blow the doors off of the equivalent EF lenses.
Brian D. Kennedy
NSN 0115
http://www.bdkennedy.com
 

by Brian K. on Sat Nov 21, 2020 5:22 pm
User avatar
Brian K.
Lifetime Member
Posts: 898
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: Virginia
Member #:00115
Thank you!
Brian D. Kennedy
NSN 0115
http://www.bdkennedy.com
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by:  
12 posts | 
  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group