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by Brandon Pittam on Thu May 11, 2017 7:51 am
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Wow, it's been years since being in the nature game.  Figure I go back to my true passion.  I sold most of my studio gear and got an awesome copy of a 300mm f2.8 I.  Now with out breaking the bank what is a good setup to support this lens.  When I had my 500mm year ago, I had a Wimberely head, but that right now is a lot for my budget.  The head mount I have on my regular manfrotto tripod can't support the weight of the camera and lens, and starts to tilt.  It's a pistol grip head with QR plate.

Looking for a setup that can support the gear and allow for off camera flash mounting.  Thanks and it's great to be back!!
-B.P.

NSN0257

5DII - 7DII
300mm f/2.8 I, 70-200mm f/2.8, 24-70mm

"Never give up until you reached your goals" - Russell Jones
 

by Swissblad on Thu May 11, 2017 10:28 am
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Welcome back!

I would look at the Jobu series of gimbals - their junior model should be OK for your 300mm f2.8, and budget wise it won't break the bank.

HTH, S
 

by E.J. Peiker on Thu May 11, 2017 10:56 am
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I also think the Jobu Jr would be an outstanding option. It is like a smaller Wimberley.
 

by Brandon Pittam on Thu May 11, 2017 5:03 pm
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Awesome!!!!  Thanks for the suggestion...ill see about a flash attachment for that too.

Gotta get in the groove
-B.P.

NSN0257

5DII - 7DII
300mm f/2.8 I, 70-200mm f/2.8, 24-70mm

"Never give up until you reached your goals" - Russell Jones
 

by Tim Driman on Tue May 16, 2017 10:57 am
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Brandon Pittam wrote:
Wow, it's been years since being in the nature game.  Figure I go back to my true passion.  I sold most of my studio gear and got an awesome copy of a 300mm f2.8 I.  Now with out breaking the bank what is a good setup to support this lens.  When I had my 500mm year ago, I had a Wimberely head, but that right now is a lot for my budget.  The head mount I have on my regular manfrotto tripod can't support the weight of the camera and lens, and starts to tilt.  It's a pistol grip head with QR plate.

Looking for a setup that can support the gear and allow for off camera flash mounting.  Thanks and it's great to be back!!


Hi Brandon: I am a wildlife / action sport photog from South Africa...

The focal length of a lens is totally dependent on what and where you shoot...Duh! But in all seriousness, you have to answer your own question then move on from that point...What are you going for and where will you be doing this?

Personally I have access to wildlife from an open game viewing vehicle and on foot and my go to kit is a 400mm Zoom...Most of the wildlife/action photogs don't go longer these days...( I am a Canon man, so mine is the 200mm-400mmf4.0 ) *Canon make the 100mm-400mm MKii f4.5-f5.6 / NIKON 85mm-400mm which are really a nice lenses....But the SIGMA 150mm-600mm, which won't break the bank... Long primes to my way of thinking are "old fashioned" thinking.... Great for portrait shots of birds and animals, but the fun is when you can capture all the movement!

I am not trying to spend your money but  the Middi f2.8 Primes should still be able to be traded in...Maybe it might be an idea to do a deal and look at a 100mm-400mm zoom or 85mm-400mm...... The SIGMA 150mm-600mm Sport has had some good reviews..

But remember that wildlife/action sport also needs a body which can shoot a fast frame rate and no less than 18 Megapix......

With respect, wildlife/action sports demand special discipline and set-up such as Back-Button-Focus for a start. You then need to squeeze out the fastest, most responsive Tracking/Auto Focus settings.

Set up: AI-SERVO is also essential to maximise your opportunities. You can try shooting in AV, but once you understand that AV simply provides you will the depth of focus, so your central story is sharp and the rest is out of focus (Bokeh), you should study the histogram and  let that guide your settings from there... Just keep the little mountain between the two vertical frames of the screen on the back of the camera.

I hate noise, so shoot permanently on AUTO ISO and have capped my ISO at ISO 800... My WHITE BALANCE is set on Auto - AWB. 

Personally I set out deciding what I want in focus, and then set full manual...My lens is an f4.00 so the distance away of my usual subjects requires between f6.3 - f7.1...I like to shoot with a fast shutter speed ( Birds flying/moving need no less than 1/2,000th or faster to freeze action.

When you sense some action, take a test shot and check your histogram to see where that little mountain is, and also activate your highlight alert (aka: Blinkies )  

Leave the F Stop as it is, and play with your shutter speed until the histogram "exposes a little to the right" if possible... Also be guided by the "blinkies"

Then learn to shoot "hand-held" for the best results.... With respect to the tripod/monopod guys...Hand-held gives better results, provided you shoot fast shutter speeds and the highest frame rate possible... I have managed to hand-hold a rig weighing about 6 Kilos, so it certainly is possible in short bursts..... * It takes practice, so if you are serious, then spend the time...I promise you that it will be worth it..... ( 1DXMKii / 200mm-400mmf4.0+1.4x .... Not for sisies ;-) !

I know this chat started out with a lens discussion, but with respect, unless you consider all the points raised here, just choosing a lens is not going to get the results you require...

I also shoot a second rig - Canon 5D MKiv / 70mm-200mm MKii f2.8.... Some days this is all I use and other days it never gets used.... But you always have to be prepared, especially if animals come right up close and dirty in the course of their activties...

If you or anyone else would like to chat about shooting in the wild, you are most welcome to contact me on my email address.

Photography is about sharing knowledge and if someone has knowledge and does not share, it is wasted...

timdriman@iafrica.com
Face Book: Tim Driman Photography
 

by Swissblad on Wed May 17, 2017 11:33 am
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Last edited by Swissblad on Thu May 18, 2017 1:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
 

by Brandon Pittam on Thu May 18, 2017 11:50 am
Brandon Pittam
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Posts: 1285
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Location: Levittown, Pa
Member #:00257
Tim, thanks for the in-depth reply. The main reason on getting the 300mm 2.8 and 7DII is for my children's sporting events, but I will be setting up for some wildlife/bird photography as well. I was looking for ideal tripiod and head setups for the current 300mm. I have both the 1.4 and 2x extenders, which with the 300mm will be adequate for my wildlife photography. In the future if I want to upgrade I will, but then will be overkill for the kids sporting.

With regards to the "settings" of the camera, I used to have my own studio so I know the ins and outs of the camera setting, etc. I was just out of the tripod/support head game, so I had no clue. HAHA

NOTE - as I am writing this my Jobu Jr. was just delivered, thanks for the recommendations for that
-B.P.

NSN0257

5DII - 7DII
300mm f/2.8 I, 70-200mm f/2.8, 24-70mm

"Never give up until you reached your goals" - Russell Jones
 

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