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by ajq on Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:49 pm
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I recently received the following message in the Epson Status Monitor for my Epson Stylus Photo R2400:
"Parts inside your printer are at the end of their service life.  See your printer documentation."

A bit of surfing on-line seems to indicate that my printer has a protection counter which has reached a factory-set limit that implies that the printer ink waste pads are full (at least the printer thinks so) and that I need to have Epson replace the pads and reset the counter.  I also found free software on-line (SSC Service Utility) that claims to be able to reset the Epson protection counters.  I tried to execute this software, but it failed by throwing an error something like - "The printer is not on, or some other error occurred."

Has anyone encountered this problem and successfully reset the protection counters?  Any other advice?  My printer seems to be dead in the water.  Thanks.

TonyQ
 

by E.J. Peiker on Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:22 pm
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It's very possible that buying a new printer will be cheaper than fixing it and you'll get better prints to boot. I recently had a problem with my Epson 3800 and with the $300 rebate they were offering at the time for the P800, it was cheaper than the repair.
 

by chrissandys27 on Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:30 pm
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E.J. Peiker wrote:
It's very possible that buying a new printer will be cheaper than fixing it and you'll get better prints to boot.  I recently had a problem with my Epson 3800 and with the $300 rebate they were offering at the time for the P800, it was cheaper than the repair.



Exactly the same situation I am in with my Epson 3800 in that the repair will be almost as expensive as a replacement P800 when you take the included inkset into account. If you do not mind me asking did you consider the Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 as an alternative to the P800 ? 
Chris Sandys
 

by E.J. Peiker on Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:16 pm
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chrissandys27 wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
It's very possible that buying a new printer will be cheaper than fixing it and you'll get better prints to boot.  I recently had a problem with my Epson 3800 and with the $300 rebate they were offering at the time for the P800, it was cheaper than the repair.



Exactly the same situation I am in with my Epson 3800 in that the repair will be almost as expensive as a replacement P800 when you take the included inkset into account. If you do not mind me asking did you consider the Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 as an alternative to the P800 ? 


Hi Chris, I very much did and contacted the two people that I know personally that know the most about printing, Royce Howland and Kevin Raber and had a quite lengthy email back and forth with each before deciding.  In the end I came to the conclusion that there is essentially no difference in print quality so I went with the product whose driver I am very familiar with after nearly 20 years of Epson pro printer use.  The $300 rebate Epson was offering also helped in the decision.  I received the check for the rebate about 7 weeks after sending in the info.
 

by chrissandys27 on Wed Mar 06, 2019 4:19 pm
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E.J. Peiker wrote:
chrissandys27 wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
It's very possible that buying a new printer will be cheaper than fixing it and you'll get better prints to boot.  I recently had a problem with my Epson 3800 and with the $300 rebate they were offering at the time for the P800, it was cheaper than the repair.



Exactly the same situation I am in with my Epson 3800 in that the repair will be almost as expensive as a replacement P800 when you take the included inkset into account. If you do not mind me asking did you consider the Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 as an alternative to the P800 ? 


Hi Chris, I very much did and contacted the two people that I know personally that know the most about printing, Royce Howland and Kevin Raber and had a quite lengthy email back and forth with each before deciding.  In the end I came to the conclusion that there is essentially no difference in print quality so I went with the product whose driver I am very familiar with after nearly 20 years of Epson pro printer use.  The $300 rebate Epson was offering also helped in the decision.  I received the check for the rebate about 7 weeks after sending in the info.


Thanks very much EJ for that reply. If after consulting Royce Howland and Kevin Raber you concluded print quality between the two printers was equal that is definitive as far as I am concerned. There is no Epson rebate in the UK so my decision between the two will be a little more difficult. However, like you, I have been an Epson pro user for a number of years ( not quite 20 but getting on for it ) so familiarity with the driver and ICC profiles for various papers counts for a lot.
Chris Sandys
 

by bartley123 on Thu Mar 07, 2019 8:40 pm
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Another 3800 to P800 switcher for same reasons listed above. A consideration when comparing the Epson to Canon is the cost of ink, definitely an important consideration. The ink cost for the Epson is much cheaper than when getting a printer with smaller capacity ink cartridges. Epson used to provide full OEM cartridges with the printer, now they've changed to cartridges only about 1/2 full.
Don Cooper
Western Mass.
http://www.doncooper.photos
 

by signgrap on Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:59 am
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I've had a P800 since Nov. 2015, buying it after my 4800 Pro died. Far few problems as the 4800 was always clogging - it used a hugh amount of ink getting rid of the clogs. No I never used the deep cleaning mode which just burned through ink; I soaked it with distiled water. The P800 has had only one slight clog since I got it over 3 years ago. Quite acceptable considering that it wasn't used/turned on for an 8 month period.
Dick Ludwig
 

by ajq on Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:46 pm
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 Back to our original sponsor. :)  I ended up having my Epson R2400 repaired, since I had an inventory of ink cartridges and the service cost seemed reasonable.  Parts for this model are no longer available, so the repairman serviced the waste ink collection pads by basically sopping them dry, then resetting the protection counter.  I'll use up my ink supply then revisit/investigate/research a suitable and more current model replacement printer.

TonyQ
 

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