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by C Baugh on Tue Mar 29, 2016 5:35 pm
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I'm trying to figure out how to price images for sale on my website when both the general public and companies involved in the trade will see the prices. Galleries, Art Consultants, etc. will be expecting a discount (maybe as much as 50%).  I entered an event last year put on by a Gallery which also publishes a catalog sent to people in the trade.  That ad will refer prospective buyers to my website (no pricing is shown in the ad itself). In addition, the Gallery is offering me space on their website for one year free of charge, but their contract states that I must offer my images at the same price in every venue where my work is offered.  I'm thinking I will have to pass on their offer, but still have the problem of what price to put on my website.  Pricing at what I would like to receive will leave me without a profit if I end of selling to someone expecting wholesale pricing and pricing for the wholesale market will probably put the images too high to appeal to the general public.  Any ideas?  Currently my site says to contact me for pricing, but I have to settle on a plan shortly so I will not come across to potential clients as unprofessional.  

Thank you,
Charleen
C. Baugh
 

by Trev on Tue Mar 29, 2016 6:39 pm
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Where do you sell more images in the galleries or your website?
Trevor Penfold
Website http://www.trevorpenfold.com
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/trevorpenfoldphoto
 

by stevenmajor on Wed Mar 30, 2016 5:42 am
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Your post articulates why I don't bother trying to sell my images. My "pay" is being in nature, the joy of making images, and the ability to share for enjoyment and instruction. Capitalism negates most creativity by promoting the mundane.
 

by bradmangas on Wed Mar 30, 2016 5:46 pm
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I would not recommend doing what you are saying you would like to do. That being publicize two different price lists.

Firstly, direct sales of photographs from a website are a very small percentage of what a photographer can make from their work. First and foremost pricing should be set at the price you are comfortable with.

Secondly, sales in galleries, even though they may be a higher percentage are extremely limited in how you sell your work. You follow “their” rules and that’s it. Their primary purpose is to make money not promote artists. Promoting artists are in their best interest but the bottom line is it doesn’t matter who the artist is as long as they can make money off of their work.

I would suggest making a decision. Do you want to have full control over your work? How it is sold and the price it is sold for. Or, do you want to pay someone to do that for you. It will be very difficult to have it both ways and not be consistent in pricing.

If you still want to do both your only legitimate option is to set pricing on your website to the same as it would be in a gallery. You simply cannot have a customer buy a piece at a gallery and then see the same piece on your website for half the price. Plus any gallery will quickly stop doing business with you if that started happening. I would then suggest providing a way for galleries to contact you if they are interested in your work. This is how I have done business with art consultants for years. After an inquiry from an art consultant or national dealer and I have a full understanding of what they are requesting I provide a personal quote that is very specific for their needs. They appreciate the personal attention and it provides a way to build a business relationship whether they purchase work or not at that time.

My personal opinion is to forego the gallery scene. Many get caught up in it due to various reasons that have nothing to do with why they chose to have a creative lifestyle. Prestige, notoriety, publicity none of these have anything to do with being an artist. And if that is the reason one becomes an artist then in my opinion they will never be an artist.

Be true to yourself, true to your work, and honest with potential clients and or customers and above all learn how to be very patient. One can put in years and years of work and still have very little to show others for it. That does not mean you have not grown, developed, and become a much better artist. With patience, determination, and a belief in what one does the rewards will be bountiful and ongoing. This is in my opinion the purpose of art, being an artist, and life in general.
 

by whitehead on Wed Mar 30, 2016 8:08 pm
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To set pricing you just need to go to other similar sites/photographers that you consider comparable and check what they charge, based on that then decide what you are happy with and charge that. You can do a flat fee for usage (rf), variable fee depending on usage type (rm) or flat fee for product. A service like photo shelter is good start as you can see prices from a bunch of togs.

You also use software such as craddock to see what market price should be (but imho it produces prices that are way above what everyone else is selling for.

Slightly different prices on different sites is not such a big issue IMHO, IF you are using stock services as well (i.e. stock agencies or the like) because they are going to undercut you any chance they get.

In terms of my own photography - I now just use an agency and give the money away to conservation - as stevemajor points out - I found that trying to shoot with stock/sales in mind killed off a lot of my creativity and willingness to experiment.
paulthompson.gallery
 

by C Baugh on Fri Apr 01, 2016 10:32 am
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Trev wrote:
Where do you sell more images in the galleries or your website?



 Last year it was about 50/50 between individuals and art consultants.  I appreciate your response. 
C. Baugh
 

by C Baugh on Fri Apr 01, 2016 10:52 am
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Location: Houston, TX
bradmangas wrote:
I would not recommend doing what you are saying you would like to do. That being publicize two different price lists.

Firstly, direct sales of photographs from a website are a very small percentage of what a photographer can make from their work. First and foremost pricing should be set at the price you are comfortable with.

Secondly, sales in galleries, even though they may be a higher percentage are extremely limited in how you sell your work. You follow “their” rules and that’s it. Their primary purpose is to make money not promote artists. Promoting artists are in their best interest but the bottom line is it doesn’t matter who the artist is as long as they can make money off of their work.

I would suggest making a decision. Do you want to have full control over your work? How it is sold and the price it is sold for. Or, do you want to pay someone to do that for you. It will be very difficult to have it both ways and not be consistent in pricing.

If you still want to do both your only legitimate option is to set pricing on your website to the same as it would be in a gallery. You simply cannot have a customer buy a piece at a gallery and then see the same piece on your website for half the price. Plus any gallery will quickly stop doing business with you if that started happening. I would then suggest providing a way for galleries to contact you if they are interested in your work. This is how I have done business with art consultants for years. After an inquiry from an art consultant or national dealer and I have a full understanding of what they are requesting I provide a personal quote that is very specific for their needs. They appreciate the personal attention and it provides a way to build a business relationship whether they purchase work or not at that time.

My personal opinion is to forego the gallery scene. Many get caught up in it due to various reasons that have nothing to do with why they chose to have a creative lifestyle. Prestige, notoriety, publicity none of these have anything to do with being an artist. And if that is the reason one becomes an artist then in my opinion they will never be an artist.

Be true to yourself, true to your work, and honest with potential clients and or customers and above all learn how to be very patient. One can put in years and years of work and still have very little to show others for it. That does not mean you have not grown, developed, and become a much better artist. With patience, determination, and a belief in what one does the rewards will be bountiful and ongoing. This is in my opinion the purpose of art, being an artist, and life in general.


Quote:
----
Thank you for the information.  I appreciate it.  I agree that I will need to make a decision and then price accordingly. I also agree with you about the personal attention given being a big plus.  I have found that to also be true with the art consultants I work with.

I just looked on line at work by a very well known, professional photographer (makes a living with his photography and has for years) and found on his own website pricing for a 20x30 open edition print on luster paper @ $900 and another image that was a limited edition on watercolor paper @ $1,500.  Then I went to Art.com and saw his work offered at $69.99 for an open edition print on premium photographic paper, size 32x24.   So this lends to my confusion over the consistent pricing issue. 

Charleen

C. Baugh
 

by bradmangas on Fri Apr 01, 2016 5:04 pm
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Quote:
I just looked on line at work by a very well known, professional photographer (makes a living with his photography and has for years) and found on his own website pricing for a 20x30 open edition print on luster paper @ $900 and another image that was a limited edition on watercolor paper @ $1,500.  Then I went to Art.com and saw his work offered at $69.99 for an open edition print on premium photographic paper, size 32x24.   So this lends to my confusion over the consistent pricing issue.



This would be confusion in a big way to any potential customer. Maybe if a photographer is very well known and there are legitimate reasons for selling work at Art.com for such lowball prices they could get away with it. It still seems like a less than desirable thing to do. But for anyone trying to make a name for themselves this would be disastrous. 

Since this was brought up I will make a point of mentioning places such as Art.com as well as Fine Art America. These are not places one should try to build a reputation. Their requirements and standard practices do not result in what can be called "Fine Art". They are "Print On Demand" sites and will print just about any size one wants from one common image file. This is not how "Fine Art" is produced. It is how discount art is produced. Or to be blunt, cheap prints. Photographers get by with using places such as this because the general public does not  know any better. I don't have an issue with the public not knowing because it is the artists job to educate others about their art. What is a problem for all photographers is when there are specific photographers selling their work through print on demand sites and claim it to be "Fine Art". It simply is not and misleads the public into thinking it is. This in turn makes true high quality legitimate Fine Art seem very expensive. I have never been of the mindset that I want to produce the cheapest art possible or to make less than honest claims just to make a sale.
 

by Trev on Sun Apr 03, 2016 3:39 pm
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C Baugh wrote:
Trev wrote:
Where do you sell more images in the galleries or your website?



 Last year it was about 50/50 between individuals and art consultants.  I appreciate your response. 

If that's the case then the prices should be the same which is always good practice anyway. I sell in Galleries but not on line (will be changing soon as we're building new site) but the prices will be the same. But I might sell some specific to the website (not available in galleries) so then the problem doesn't exist.

I've noticed that some photographers have the same price for all there images dependent on size. I'm not sure that's a good thing I think some images deserve a higher price than others.

Good luck with what ever you decide to do but just remember if you upset the galleries you work with they'll drop you in a blink of an eye and if your selling 50% of your work through them that won't be good.
Trevor Penfold
Website http://www.trevorpenfold.com
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/trevorpenfoldphoto
 

by C Baugh on Thu Apr 21, 2016 4:03 pm
C Baugh
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Posts: 23
Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Trev wrote:
C Baugh wrote:
Trev wrote:
Where do you sell more images in the galleries or your website?



 Last year it was about 50/50 between individuals and art consultants.  I appreciate your response. 

If that's the case then the prices should be the same which is always good practice anyway. I sell in Galleries but not on line (will be changing soon as we're building new site) but the prices will be the same. But I might sell some specific to the website (not available in galleries) so then the problem doesn't exist.

I've noticed that some photographers have the same price for all there images dependent on size. I'm not sure that's a good thing I think some images deserve a higher price than others.

Good luck with what ever you decide to do but just remember if you upset the galleries you work with they'll drop you in a blink of an eye and if your selling 50% of your work through them that won't be good.



Thank you.   A lot to think about.  Appreciate your reply and thoughts.  I too see that most often images are priced by size and substrate, which as you mention, may not be the best route.  The idea of having some specific images available on my website that are not available in galleries may be a very good option.  More to think about.  Thank you again.  
C. Baugh
 

by Jeff Colburn on Wed Apr 27, 2016 12:54 pm
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Location: Cottonwood, Arizona
Hi,

Most retail outlets (framers, interior designers, etc.) know to contact the photographer to get the retail price. I have an order form and pricing sheet for retail clients that I send on request.

As for figuring out pricing, check out these links:
http://www.thecreativescorner.com/what-to-charge-for-your-prints/
http://www.thecreativescorner.com/how-to-sell-products-from-your-website/

Have Fun,
Jeff
Fine Art Prints and Stock Photography of Arizona www.JeffColburn.com See my ebooks in the NatureScapes Store 25 Places To Sell Your Photographs And Photography Skills and The Vanishing Old West - Jerome
 

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