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by Aaron Jors on Wed Nov 18, 2020 5:40 pm
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I’ve had a BenQ SW2700PT for some time and just upgraded my secondary monitor to one of these as well.  I have done all my color critical work on the BenQ previously so never really worried about color, calibration or matching on the secondary monitor.  With the upgrade I’d like to better understand calibrating both although I will still use the primary monitor for all color critical work.

To calibrate the single monitor I use the BenQ pallet master software with a Sypder5 Pro device.

From what I have read it is difficult to get 2 monitors even the same model to match so based on this I am not sure if the goal should be to get the monitors to match as close as possible or to make sure both monitors are properly calibrated regardless if one looks different than the other.  Although I assume if properly calibrated they should look somewhat similar.

Graphcis Card is the NVIDIA RTX3070.

Looking for general feedback on the best way to approach this and then also have a few specific questions;

- Do I need to individually calibrate each display or do I create one calibration setting and apply it to both monitors?
- Although I don’t use the Spyder 5 software for calibration I do have it installed on my computer.  Will having the software installed interfere with the pallet master calibration, or only if I would actually calibrate with the spyder 5 software?
-  Are their other areas in Windows, Graphics Card, etc. where I need to verify or change settings.

Thanks, Aaron
 

by photoman4343 on Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:54 pm
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Aaron, I do not know the answer to your question. The answer may also depend on what computer and operating system you are running like a windows desktop with win 10 Pro or something equivalent for an Apple computer.

I recall that when I had a digital projector and a windows laptop, I was advised to calibrate each separately and save the profile file for each in a safe place. And then use the correct profile for each device when that device was being used. . I had a tough time doing the latter.

Wait for other opinions as mine are likely not to be that worthwhile for your situation.

Good luck.
Joe Smith
 

by Ed Cordes on Thu Nov 19, 2020 9:18 pm
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Hi Aaron, like Joe, I don't know if I am totally correct. However, I think running dual monitors depends on the graphics card you have.  Even then I was told long ago that you couldn't have two profiles - one for each monitor - even if they were the same profile.  Theoretically, it would seem that even if the monitors were exactly the same make and model there would be different calibrations as no two panels are exactly the same.  I am interested to hear someone more expert weigh in on this.
Remember, a little mild insanity keeps us healthy
 

by E.J. Peiker on Fri Nov 20, 2020 2:27 pm
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Since the BenQ supports uploading a profile to the monitor itself via their software, you should be able to first calibrate the non-BenQ monitor and then restart the computer. Both monitors will now be running the profile for the other monitor. Now calibrate the BenQ using their software which uploads the profile to just their monitor. That profile should, in theory compensate for whatever the changes were for the other monitor resulting in a reasonably close match between the monitors. They won't be exactly the same because they aren't the same panel but it should be pretty close.
 

by Aaron Jors on Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:39 pm
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E.J. Peiker wrote:
Since the BenQ supports uploading a profile to the monitor itself via their software, you should be able to first calibrate the non-BenQ monitor and  then restart the computer.  Both monitors will now be running the profile for the other monitor.  Now calibrate the BenQ using their software which uploads the profile to just their monitor.  That profile should, in theory compensate for  whatever the changes were for the other monitor resulting in a reasonably close match between the monitors.  They won't be exactly the same because they aren't the same panel but it should be pretty close.


Thanks E.J.  Both monitors are actually identical I purchased a second BenQ.  So with that being said would I just calibrate the primary monitor with the BenQ software and then upload that calibration to the 2nd monitor?  In this case I would never actually profile the 2nd monitor.
 

by Mark L on Fri Nov 20, 2020 6:30 pm
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Although they are the same model monitor, they are not "identical" panels and therefore are expected to have distinctions (which may be more minor compared to different model monitors or monitors from different manufacturers).  Presumably you want to calibrate each panel as specifically as you can.  
 

by E.J. Peiker on Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:47 pm
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Aaron Jors wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
Since the BenQ supports uploading a profile to the monitor itself via their software, you should be able to first calibrate the non-BenQ monitor and  then restart the computer.  Both monitors will now be running the profile for the other monitor.  Now calibrate the BenQ using their software which uploads the profile to just their monitor.  That profile should, in theory compensate for  whatever the changes were for the other monitor resulting in a reasonably close match between the monitors.  They won't be exactly the same because they aren't the same panel but it should be pretty close.


Thanks E.J.  Both monitors are actually identical I purchased a second BenQ.  So with that being said would I just calibrate the primary monitor with the BenQ software and then upload that calibration to the 2nd monitor?  In this case I would never actually profile the 2nd monitor.

They will likely be close enough that you can't tell the difference with human eye sight in that case.  Yes, they will never be exactly the same but if you can't tell the difference, who cares :)
 

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