Moderator: E.J. Peiker

All times are UTC-05:00

  
« Previous topic | Next topic »  
Reply to topic  
 First unread post  | 16 posts | 
by Richard B. on Sat Oct 07, 2023 4:32 pm
Richard B.
Lifetime Member
Posts: 283
Joined: 14 Feb 2004
Location: Central Massachusetts
Member #:01199
Hello, 

Here in the Northeast USA, many people with backyard feeders have observed that they seem to have very few birds this fall. Typical comments are "I usually have to fill my feeders at least once a week - even in the fall". This year, they observe that there seems to be very little bird activity at their feeders, and the feeders are staying full for a long time. Some of the state Audubon societies are noting the same. 

In my own experience, I don't even see Goldfinches, Chickadees, or Tufted Titmouse at my feeder. My medium size tube feeder is only down 1-2 inches in three weeks, and that is with black oil sunflower seeds in the feeder. I know it is prime time for natural food to be be available to the birds, but this lack of feeding is unusual. We have had a wet and humid summer here in New England, but not unusually hot, just uncomfortable. 

So my question is, have people noticed similar reduced bird activity in other parts of the country? Not meaning to be Chicken Little here, but I am curious as to what other people are seeing.

Richard B.
 

by Karl Egressy on Sun Oct 08, 2023 12:34 am
User avatar
Karl Egressy
Forum Contributor
Posts: 39962
Joined: 11 Dec 2004
Location: Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Member #:00988
I noticed the same at my feeders and at places I visit for the last nineteen years for birding.
Every year I see less and less birds but this year is especially quiet. No birds. It might pick up later.
 

by david fletcher on Sun Oct 08, 2023 4:08 am
User avatar
david fletcher
Moderator
Posts: 35103
Joined: 24 Sep 2004
Location: UK
Member #:00525
It's the same over here in the Uk for myself and my father in law who lives 20 miles from me. Been very quiet and the feeders have needed less attention and top ups.

Makes you wonder whether the "global warming" effect is changing food availability and feeding habits as well as my main fear, in that humans are decimating bird numbers, as we have seen significant drops in some specie numbers over the last 50 years.
David Fletcher   Moderator.   Birds, Photo & Digital Art

Make your life spectacular!

NSN00525
 

by Mark Robinson on Sun Oct 08, 2023 4:42 am
Mark Robinson
Forum Contributor
Posts: 252
Joined: 25 Aug 2003
Location: Port Washington, N.Y.
Far fewer birds here on the north shore of Nassau county, Long Island. The spring time gold finches, which usually show up in large numbers, were almost non existent this year. I have thistle feeders out as always. Not seeing tufted titmice or black-capped chickadees, which I usually do see. My back yard is planted with native species and I have a black oil sunflower seed feeder out. The predominant bird I see there are house sparrows and an occasional northern cardinal.

I have been doing the CBC for the local Audubon chapter in the same location for years. The bird numbers are steadily declining there as far as I have seen as well.

Too many pesticide applications on lawns might have an impact, IMO.
Mark Robinson
http://www.critterlight.com
 

by MBilak on Sun Oct 08, 2023 10:59 am
User avatar
MBilak
Forum Contributor
Posts: 29
Joined: 24 Feb 2014
I'm in coastal Maine just north-east of Mount Desert Island, and there has been a notable lack of birds at my feeders.  I'm getting a few chickadees, nuthatches and juncos but the only species with normal numbers is Blue Jay.  This year has been the worst for bird photography at my yard.setup.  I sure hope this isn't a lot term trend, but I fear otherwise.
 

by Jim Zipp on Mon Oct 09, 2023 7:12 am
User avatar
Jim Zipp
Lifetime Member
Posts: 4976
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: CT
Member #:00150
Not saying there are no problems but having run a "Bird and Birding Shop" for 30 years I can tell you that I hear this EVERY year around now. Even squirrels that I typically have a doz of near my feeders are MIA. The reason this happens is that everything is going to seed. It is a time of plenty for the birds and critters with nuts, acorns and seed of a million types all falling now and most animals prefer to eat natural foods but will return to our feeders soon. So, unless something is different this year from the last 30 all will be back to normal soon. Not painting a rosy picture as I know there are plenty of problems but slow feeders is not one of them. Jim
Jim Zipp
http://www.jimzippphotography.com
 

by mveltri2@cogeco.ca on Tue Oct 10, 2023 1:06 am
mveltri2@cogeco.ca
Forum Contributor
Posts: 1
Joined: 31 Jul 2017
Jim Zipp wrote: Not saying there are no problems but having run a "Bird and Birding Shop" for 30  years I can tell you that I hear this EVERY year around now.  Even squirrels that I typically have a doz of near my feeders are MIA.  The reason this happens is that everything is going to seed.  It is a time of plenty for the birds and critters with nuts, acorns and seed of a million types all falling now and most animals prefer to eat natural foods but will return to our feeders soon.  So, unless something is different this year from the last 30 all will be back to normal soon.  Not painting a rosy picture as I know there are plenty of problems but slow feeders is not one of them.
This has nothing to do with "everything going to seed".
For the last two years two hotspots that were the go to spots for warblers in my area have been dead.
Best day this spring was a count of 5 species, and only a handful of birds, no more that a dozen in the count of five species.
This is too hot spots that have produced many many fall outs over the years.

Common species like red-winged blackbirds where there would be fifty birds in our local marsh have maybe a dozen birds.
Black crowned night herons, green herons, egrets and blue herons all down in numbers, some almost non existent.
No gold finches, no chickadees.... this is not about seeds, it's more about the insect population crashing, imo.
What scientists are calling the 6th extinction.

And as far as it not being a feeder issue, then why no hummingbirds at the feeders, no goldfinches coming to black sunflower seed?
Maybe your forunate that you have birds at the feeders, most people don't and the reason someone would post asking if others see what he sees, low numbers of birds or no birds. Sad times for sure...
 

by Jim Zipp on Tue Oct 10, 2023 7:19 am
User avatar
Jim Zipp
Lifetime Member
Posts: 4976
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: CT
Member #:00150
I was addressing the posters question about "Feeder Birds" and after tracking the seed sales for 30 years I stand by my statement that it happens every year with some years being more drastic than others depending on natural seed crops. Goldfinch are very nomadic and always a wild card.

Having said that, I did say that I wasn't painting a rosy picture and that I agreed that there are huge issues for birds.
Jim Zipp
http://www.jimzippphotography.com
 

by Ed Cordes on Wed Oct 18, 2023 7:39 am
User avatar
Ed Cordes
Forum Contributor
Posts: 4922
Joined: 11 Mar 2004
Location: Corning, NY
Member #:00700
While we here in Corning, NY (South Central on the PA Border) below the Finger Lakes, we generally see a bit less activity in the fall, this year seems to have much more dramatic reduction. No squirrels, only an occasional titmouse or chickadee. Dramatically less doves. We do have a few downy and hairy woodpeckers, but still less than usual. It will be interesting to see when things recover.
Remember, a little mild insanity keeps us healthy
 

by Jim Zipp on Wed Oct 18, 2023 10:10 am
User avatar
Jim Zipp
Lifetime Member
Posts: 4976
Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: CT
Member #:00150
Ed Cordes wrote: While we here in Corning, NY (South Central on the PA Border) below the Finger Lakes, we generally see a bit less activity in the fall, this year seems to have much more dramatic reduction.  No squirrels, only an occasional titmouse or chickadee.  Dramatically less doves.  We do have a few downy and hairy woodpeckers, but still less than usual.  It will be interesting to see when things recover.
Same here Ed.  Although things are already slowly turning around.  Flocks of White-throated Sparrows and a few first Juncos arriving.  Went from a doz or more squirrels a day to 0 but finally have a few hanging around.  Same as birds.  Not at feeders much but plenty in the woods and fields.  We have a fairly large base if customers after 30 years to draw our conclusions on over the years and while like I said, this happens most years this year it has been more dramatic than usual. 

While every year there seems to be a few less than last, I really don't think there has been any massive die off of our local feeder birds.
Jim Zipp
http://www.jimzippphotography.com
 

by Steve Cirone on Wed Oct 18, 2023 2:39 pm
User avatar
Steve Cirone
Lifetime Member
Posts: 2262
Joined: 29 May 2005
Location: El Cajon, California
Member #:00583
Some good news: We live on the 4th floor of a downtown complex with a tiny patio. My spouse set up a hummingbird feeder and they emptied it in less than a day. I replaced that feeder with two half gallon feeders. Ten at a time mob the feeders and drain them dry in 48 hours. We get to see tiny newborns about the size of a big bumble bee.
 
DAILY IMAGE GALLERY:  https://www.facebook.com/steve.cirone.1

 IMAGE GALLERY ARCHIVES WITH EXIF: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevecirone/
 

by SantaFeJoe on Fri Dec 15, 2023 9:39 pm
User avatar
SantaFeJoe
Forum Contributor
Posts: 8640
Joined: 28 Jan 2012
Location: Somewhere Out In The Wilds
You may find this helpful:

Ebird Status Reports

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Ed Cordes on Sat Dec 16, 2023 9:06 am
User avatar
Ed Cordes
Forum Contributor
Posts: 4922
Joined: 11 Mar 2004
Location: Corning, NY
Member #:00700
Thanks for all the replies. It is now mid-December and I am pleased to report that all of our usual friends are back at the feeders. Life is now back to normal.
Remember, a little mild insanity keeps us healthy
 

by Mitash on Thu May 30, 2024 10:49 am
Mitash
Forum Contributor
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 Jan 2014
Location: Siliguri, West Bengal, India
I’ve noticed the same thing in the Midwest. Usually, by this time of year, my feeders are bustling with activity, but this fall has been strangely quiet. I've hardly seen any of the usual suspects like Cardinals and Nuthatches. It’s been a bit concerning since I usually have to refill my feeders weekly, but lately, they’re barely touched.

I read that the abundance of natural food sources could be a factor, which seems to align with what’s happening here. Our summer was mild but quite wet, leading to plenty of natural food for the birds.

For anyone looking for more detailed insights and potential solutions, I've found some helpful guides on https://birding.pro/. They’ve got good resources that might shed some light on this unusual behavior. Plus, they cover a wide range of birding topics that might interest you.


Last edited by Mitash on Tue Jun 04, 2024 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
 

by SantaFeJoe on Thu May 30, 2024 11:12 am
User avatar
SantaFeJoe
Forum Contributor
Posts: 8640
Joined: 28 Jan 2012
Location: Somewhere Out In The Wilds
It's been a very different spring around here. The feeders are being used some, but not like other years. What there has been is an abundance of Western Tanagers. I have gone through several bags of oranges trying to keep up with them. Something also of note is that my neighbor who has many deciduous trees has way more birds and more variety.
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Wildflower-nut on Thu May 30, 2024 3:21 pm
Wildflower-nut
Forum Contributor
Posts: 827
Joined: 4 Mar 2008
wow. first new post in months!
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by:  
16 posts | 
  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group