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by OntPhoto on Sat Jul 16, 2016 12:19 am
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http://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2016/07/bird-portraits-forsgren/
 

by stevenmajor on Sat Jul 16, 2016 7:35 am
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Disgusting human behavior.
 

by richard bledsoe on Sun Jul 17, 2016 9:37 am
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This is so retarded! Agree with Steven Major.
 

by EGrav on Sun Jul 17, 2016 10:32 am
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Despicable -


Last edited by EGrav on Mon Jul 18, 2016 8:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
 

by Primus on Mon Jul 18, 2016 7:16 am
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Just don't see how this is 'fun' for anybody.

Pradeep
 

by hullyjr on Mon Jul 18, 2016 2:18 pm
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No justification for stressing these birds any further by taking a photo that lacks any scientific merit. I'm surprised the bander allowed this.

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by OntPhoto on Tue Jul 19, 2016 8:27 pm
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I read that they had research scientists along and actually did band (usually includes weighing the bird and checking out its age via feather wear, etc.) some of the birds. So, it's not like it was only for photography.
 

by E.J. Peiker on Wed Jul 20, 2016 7:09 am
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"Gently captured" and their opening image is one of a hummingbird that is essentially in a net noose...
 

by Paul Fusco on Wed Jul 20, 2016 11:12 am
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OntPhoto wrote:I read that they had research scientists along and actually did band (usually includes weighing the bird and checking out its age via feather wear, etc.) some of the birds.  So, it's not like it was only for photography.
The part that nobody likes to hear about when it comes to banding small birds caught in mist nets is that there are casualties. But that's okay because it's done in the name of science even tho band returns are minimal.
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by OntPhoto on Fri Jul 22, 2016 11:41 pm
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I don't have stats on the subject. I am sure they can be found online or in publications, somewhere. I don't know what type of birds are being banded in New Zealand but I read this, "Since the first banding schemes started in 1947, over 1.4 million birds from 241 different species have been banded throughout New Zealand. On an annual basis we receive almost 1,500 reports of these banded birds that have been recovered, dead or alive."

I know they band peregrine falcons here in Ontario and that helps to keep track of where the young birds go to nest and other aspects of their life. You'd often read that a new adult male or female has taken up a nest at XX location and the bands show it had been a fledgling banded at XX location 3 years ago. I am sure this info is helpful for those monitoring these birds.

While not exactly "banding", Project Snow Storm places transmitters on Snowy Owls to monitor their movements to help understand where they go, their migration routes, etc.. One can Google this and read what the benefits are in doing this.
 

by OntPhoto on Mon Jul 25, 2016 12:52 am
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Here's an unusual but somewhat related news story.  According to the report, the owners of the Jack Miner bird sanctuary located near Kingsville, Ontario are worried that their banded Canada Geese may have become targeted for their unique leg bands which have the words Jack Miner inscribed on it.  Seven dead birds were found near the sanctuary and fear is that some may have been targeted for their bands.

According to the article, "Speeding motorists have also been a long-standing threat to geese at the sanctuary, but finding animals with the bands removed indicates something more than just an accident...".  The executive director at the sanctuary explained that the bands have become a hot commodity with some being sold online for hefty prices and one posted for $5,000." - CBC

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/dead-geese-ha ... 00646.html
 

by Greg Downing on Mon Jul 25, 2016 10:28 am
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The debate about whether or not this is a humane research tactic is another discussion altogether...But when birds are caught in mist nets there should be NO delay in getting them uncaught, doing your research and data collection quickly, and then letting them go. Any delay is only further stressing the bird. < period. Imaging hanging from a noose, as EJ described, long enough for a photographer to erect a white background and do some flash photography. That IMO adds immensely to the stress of the bird as the photographer tinkers with his settings and gets his shots. And besides, who wants to look at birds caught in a net obviously stressed and terrified? Not me.
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by larryt on Thu Jul 28, 2016 8:16 pm
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How does banding help the birds other than satisfying the scientists curiosity?
 

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