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by Paul Skoczylas on Sat Apr 06, 2024 11:54 am
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Hello everyone!  It's been a while since I've posted here...  But I see lots of familiar names.

I have been doing less nature photography of late -- my new location lends itself to a different sort of photography.  (And 2022-2023 were actually my two most prolific years in terms of photography.)  I say "new", but I changed jobs at the end of 2019...  We have a bit of a different life now.  I still work in the same field as before, but instead of living in a city of a million people, I live in a village with a couple hundred.  On my daily commute (a bit under 20 minutes each way), if I see more than three cars (other than in the 500 m closest to the office), it's a busy day.  I'm typing this looking out my bedroom window, from which I see no other houses--just trees and our yard, with its five chickens and four Ouessant sheep.  My game camera has captured badgers and foxes in our yard, in addition to rabbits and various weasels.  I've seen a grey heron on our pond more than once.  (The danged thing killed our koi.)  We had barn owls living in our fireplace (which was boarded up) for two summers.  They moved out, but we have Little Owls living in the old school at the end of our alley.

Anyway, to get to my question...

I shoot mainly with a Canon 5D Mark IV.  My backup camera is a 5D Mk II.  (It doesn't get used much, but sometimes I take it along when I don't want to be switching lenses.  And the Mk IV went in for repairs twice, so it was good to have a second camera.)  The three lenses in my main travelling camera bag are the 24-105 IS USM Mk II, a Sigma 150 Macro, and an Irix 11mm.  On days when I can bring the full bag, there's a 24 TSE Mk II and a 300/2.8 IS (Mk I), and a 17-40 (which gets very little use given the 24-105 and the 11mm).

I don't think there's much life left in the Mk II.  And Canon won't repair it anymore.  The SET button was stuck--but I managed to pry it free, so it's working again for now.

If I were to buy a new camera body to have two good cameras, should I stay EF, or move to the R series?  I can simply buy another 5DMkIV--that's the simple approach.  (What about a 6D?  What are the advantages of that?)  Or do I move to R?  Which one?  I believe there's an adapter to use the EF lenses on it (correct), so I would get that, but what RF lens (or lenses) should I get to start with?

I haven't been keeping up on all the latest gear, so please forgive me if this has all been discussed in the past.

I appreciate your input.

Thanks!
[url=http://www3.telus.net/avrsvr/]Paul's Website[/url] [url=http://paulsnaturephotos.blogspot.com/]Paul's Blog[/url]
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by Carol Clarke on Sat Apr 06, 2024 1:32 pm
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Great to 'see' you again Paul.  I will leave your questions for those qualified to give you good advice - but I just wanted to say that its always good to hear from you and I hope life is being kind.  Your new home sounds fascinating.  :) 

Carol.
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by Phil Shaw on Sat Apr 06, 2024 3:35 pm
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Hi Paul,
Things have moved on quite a bit since the Canon 5D Mark IV, but a camera is still a camera, so it depends very much on how much money you want to spend - or if you want to spend. A 5D Mark IV and the lenses that you have, will still deliver like they did before. Moving to Mirrorless has benefits, and these will develop into the future with the advent of on-chip AI, Pro-capture etc. So it just depends on what you want to do in terms of image capture, how much money you want to spend and whether you can still manage to heft those older, heavy bodies and lenses ;). Some of the new technology is just astounding, but that may be not you need for the type of images that you want to capture.
Phil Shaw
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by Craig Lipski on Tue Apr 09, 2024 9:06 am
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My 5D IV is circling the drain, I’m in the same quandary.  I know this camera is capable! 
TBH, I haven’t looked at your pics, but I think “horses for courses” - what, how do you shoot, what are you “missing” from your current setup?  Will the R5 help with that?  30 Mpx is nice, 45 is better?  7fps is usually “good enough”, 20 fps is better?  How much do the viewfinder content/capabilities matter to you?    IBIS sure sounds good, I hear the adapter works a charm.  I’ll follow along - thanks for asking this.

I’ll piggyback a related question.  If I use an IS EF lens on an R5 (via adapter), will I get the combined benefit of lens IS and IBIS, or will they fight each other, necessitating turning one off?  (Hopefully a short answer that won’t hijack the thread).
 

by Paul Skoczylas on Tue Apr 09, 2024 2:13 pm
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Thanks everyone.

Phil -- good point about the weight. a year or two ago, I removed the battery grips from both bodies. I loved them, the weight as just too much. (None of us are as young as were were...)

I don't need (or really want) 45 MPix. Do the smaller pixels really capture more detail, or just noise and diffraction? If they really capture detail, I'll happily accept them. I almost never need more speed. The viewfinder is an interesting question... I would love to get some feedback on the electronic viewfinder of the R5. (Is the R5 still the best choice in that series to move from the 5D Mk4?) Focus is a big one for me--if the R5 does a better job of focussing on the bird or animal's eye, or on that bee or flower when I'm shooting macro; then I will probably go that way. High ISO is very important to me. I frequently shoot handheld inside churches, including down in the crypts. The 5D4 is pretty good at high ISO, but it is a bit noisy. (Really the 5D4 is much better than the 5D2, and light years ahead of anything else I've used, so I'm not complaining!) I probably don't need higher ISO than the 5D4--but less noise at high ISO would be nice.

I am almost always shooting handheld. It's mainly travel photography--castles and churches. But i still get an occasional bird, animal, or macro shot. In theory, I could use my tripod more, but I'm not usually carrying it with me. (Again, a question of weight. My Gitzo GT3541XLS isn't exactly featherweight.) Last weekend, I did shoot a couple of images on my tripod with the 24 TSE Mk2, so it does happen... but nearly as much as when I was shooting landscapes in the Canadian Rockies.

The idea of replacing lenses is not really appealing--until such time as I have to. (I really hope my 300 hangs on a while longer!) There's a big investment in glass, and I certainly can't replace all of it. So if obtaining the true benefit of switching format requires new glass, there's not as much point.

Thanks to all for you opinions!
[url=http://www3.telus.net/avrsvr/]Paul's Website[/url] [url=http://paulsnaturephotos.blogspot.com/]Paul's Blog[/url]
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by Phil Shaw on Tue Apr 09, 2024 3:02 pm
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If you are frequently shooting at high ISO, you should check out DxO PureRAW 4. The noise elimination and detail recovery is truely amazing - better than anything else I've used.
Phil Shaw
Essex, UK
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by Dick Ginkowski on Sat Apr 13, 2024 3:33 pm
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I also haven't been around forever! Good to see you!

If you want to keep your Canon glass you could try for the 6D or 5Div as you mentioned. I have been shooting mirrorless since before it was cool and have never been impressed with Canon's late entry into the foray. My eyes may not be as good as they once were but I notice a bit less sharpness from their mirrorless cameras and lenses. Also, they didn't downsize much.

I am a Fuji shooter now and have not looked back. Is that an option for you? Also, with Fuji mirrorless, you can use a much more compact (and lighter) tripod. I no longer carry a camera bag as my gear fits in a regular carryon.
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by Carol Clarke on Sun Apr 14, 2024 7:35 am
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Dick Ginkowski wrote: I also haven't been around forever!  Good to see you!

If you want to keep your Canon glass you could try for the 6D or 5Div as you mentioned.  I have been shooting mirrorless since before it was cool and have never been impressed with Canon's late entry into the foray.  My eyes may not be as good as they once were but I notice a bit less sharpness from their mirrorless cameras and lenses.  Also, they didn't downsize much.

I am a Fuji shooter now and have not looked back.  Is that an option for you?  Also, with Fuji mirrorless, you can use a much more compact (and lighter) tripod.  I no longer carry a camera bag as my gear fits in a regular carryon.
Good to know you're still around, Dick!  Best wishes to you.

Carol.
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by Ed Cordes on Sun Apr 14, 2024 4:39 pm
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three years ago I switched to the R5 from 5D4 as soon as the R5 was available.  to me and my shooting style the benefits were huge. 1. a bit lighter 2. being able to see the exposure in the viewfinder is a huge advantage. 3. the animal eye AF is just superb.  I have achieved many shots I would have totally blown without #2 & #3.  The first year or so I used the adapter and found it to be great.  The combined IBIS and lens IS worked fine with AF remaining excellent with the adapter.  Once I decided the R5 was a keeper I started to change lenses to the R series So I would not have to have the extra length and weight of the adapter and recouping as much of my EF investment as possible.  Hope this helps.
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by Karl Egressy on Mon Apr 15, 2024 6:36 am
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Ed Cordes describes the advantage of having a mirrorless camera very eloquently.
You can pick up a used one this time for about sixty percent of the original price as the Mark II is coming out soon.
I have Canon R5 R7 and Nikon Z8. R5 focuses the best among the three I have.
What I don't like about it is that in electronic mode it shoots 20 FPS that I find too many and you don't hear the shutter so you shoot more than you otherwise would. Aside those two minor problems the camera is great.
 

by Dave Weber on Wed May 15, 2024 10:51 pm
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.
You've all got GAS.

I can shoot any camera that I choose, and I choose to shoot the original Canon 5d Classic.  I've shot and owned just about every brand, and I find that the fillmic colors and overall rendering of the 5D are unique and nearly impossible to replicate in post.

Also, I like the simpler menu and controls of the 5D.  I've got 7 of them, and they're so cheap that if I break one, or it gets stolen, so what?

Most of all, the 5D images make me smile more (much more) than the images I take with my modern Fuji, Pentax, or Nikon bodies.

Have fun, and don't worry about keeping up with the the latest gear other photographers are using. 
 

by Dick Ginkowski on Wed May 15, 2024 11:22 pm
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Dave Weber wrote: .
You've all got GAS.

I can shoot any camera that I choose, and I choose to shoot the original Canon 5d Classic.  I've shot and owned just about every brand, and I find that the fillmic colors and overall rendering of the 5D are unique and nearly impossible to replicate in post.

Also, I like the simpler menu and controls of the 5D.  I've got 7 of them, and they're so cheap that if I break one, or it gets stolen, so what?

Most of all, the 5D images make me smile more (much more) than the images I take with my flagship Fuji, Pentax, or Nikon bodies.

Have fun, and don't worry about keeping up with the the latest gear other photographers are using. 

I'm glad your situation works for you but that really doesn't equate to being judgmental about someone else's needs which may not be the same as yours.  We are in the end experts in our own stories.

Apart from the judgmental tone of the first and last paragraphs, there is meat in the rest of your post.  When I made the switch from Canon DSLRs to Fuji mirrorless I did so because advancing age and receding health made the reduced size and weight of Fuji's mirrorless cameras (and excellent glass) attractive as it allowed me to keep shooting. I also knew that because I was an early entrant to the Fuji mirrorless system (as I was with Canon's DSLRs in 2001) there would be evolution into better camera bodies with improved functionality.  That said, there also comes a point when it isn't necessary to buy the latest releases because the current gear works well and creates good images.  My latest camera bodies are the X-T3 and X-T30 and I still use the X-T2.  They meet my needs quite nicely and I didn't see any need to spend more money because that would be diminishing returns (thanks, Fuji).  If someone's needs are different and they are met with more current gear I am not going to berate them even though my "older" gear still meets my needs and didn't stop working when the newer stuff came out.
Dick Ginkowski
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Farewell, dear Alex.
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by SantaFeJoe on Thu May 16, 2024 9:45 pm
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Dave Weber until you've seen what the latest MIL cameras can do, you will never understand the benefits. The z8 has an incredible eye-focus system, excellent high ISO capabilities, follow focus, silent mode so that the subject doesn't get startled, light weight, lightweight lenses, VR system, and so much more. I had never seen the vast improvements in any prior camera system, although the z9 and others are much the same. There is just no comparison. Holding on to old "has beens" will only keep you from a lot of surprising improvements in photographic equipment. If you rent a current higher level camera and lens or lenses, I'm sure you will change your view. This is far different from GAS.

Joe
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by Karl Egressy on Fri May 17, 2024 6:51 am
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I fully agree with Joe.
However, you can enjoy all the benefits if you are willing to learn and put in some time to go through all the settings and even do some practice sessions at home.
My Canon R5 and Nikon Z8 are set up to get most of the advances in latest technology.
My wife on the other hand is not willing to learn and her camera is set up to be equal to that of Nikon R500.
She still takes excellent images, but missing out on eye detection and the rest.
I'm 81 years old and still willing to learn.
My friend who is 83 years old is afraid to use his R5, so I'll meet him soon, set up his camera and explain all the features to him.
We are all different.
 

by flygirl on Mon May 20, 2024 9:30 am
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Hi all! It has nothing to do with GAS whatsoever!! The new mirrorless systems are incredible and what brought me over was mainly the viewfinder as in seeing your settings immediately and the quiet shutter. The other very large difference has to do with the lenses. Such incredible technology at a big weight reduction. I went all in and now have two Z9's. My clients were moving that way and I felt I needed to join in most importantly because I bring lots of teaching to my workshops and wanted to know the technology. But, I must say, I love it!!! BUT, on the other hand there is a lot to learn, and much that is different, as well as much that is the same. The 400 4.5 at 2.5 pounds is awesome, and I have sold my 500 f/4 FL lens, just do not like the weight anymore.
 

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