fbpixel
  
« Previous topic | Next topic »  
Reply to topic  
 First unread post  | 14 posts | 
by OntPhoto on Fri Jul 05, 2019 11:30 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
Anyone own expensive lenses that are no longer being supported by the manufacturer, whether it be Nikon or Canon?  Are you concerned, worried?  Don't expect anything bad to happen?  I know, for some years after the official support ends, there may still be parts available somewhere. 

I personally don't own any expensive lenses that are no longer being supported.  The Canon 70-200 2.8L non-IS is no longer supported by Canon.  I don't know if the original 100-400L IS and 400 5.6L are still supported.  I'm guessing maybe no for the 1-4?  Maybe the 400 5.6L is still supported because there is no replacement out for that lens? 

Expensive.  I know someone with the Canon 500 f4 I that needs servicing due to an accident.  There was talk about machining a part for it but think they'll try and get a used part from somewhere.
 

by Woodswalker on Sat Jul 06, 2019 7:47 am
Woodswalker
Forum Contributor
Posts: 430
Joined: 12 Apr 2008
It's simply a fact of life in this business. There's a danger in keeping gear too long. Manufacturers are on to the next big thing and will only support the last big thing for so long then you're on your own. There are repair shops like Sun Camera Service (the US likely has equivalents) in Toronto who will repair older gear. My friend had an old Canon 400 f/2.8 repaired there. I hope they still do this.
 

by E.J. Peiker on Sun Jul 07, 2019 11:43 am
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 83914
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
There are third parties that will still repair most but not all of them. One factor is availability of parts, the other is lead glass elements which I guess are both parts availability issues and the later is also a potential safety issue for those working on them.
 

by OntPhoto on Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:33 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
E.J. Peiker wrote:
There are third parties that will still repair most but not all of them.  One factor is availability of parts, the other is lead glass elements which I guess are both parts availability issues and the later is also a potential safety issue for those working on them.

When did they stop using lead in glass elements?  Thankful for the third party repair shops.  Canon is still selling the original 70-200 2.8L non-IS even though they no longer support it. 
 

by OntPhoto on Sun Jul 07, 2019 8:35 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
Woodswalker wrote:
It's simply a fact of life in this business. There's a danger in keeping gear too long. Manufacturers are on to the next big thing and will only support the last big thing for so long then you're on your own. There are repair shops like Sun Camera Service (the US likely has equivalents) in Toronto who will repair older gear. My friend had an old Canon 400 f/2.8 repaired there. I hope they still do this.

Sun Camera is the shop I am using.  A part for the 70-200 2.8L non-IS is back-ordered.  Part may be coming from Canon Japan.
 

by E.J. Peiker on Sun Jul 07, 2019 9:32 pm
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 83914
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
OntPhoto wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
There are third parties that will still repair most but not all of them.  One factor is availability of parts, the other is lead glass elements which I guess are both parts availability issues and the later is also a potential safety issue for those working on them.

When did they stop using lead in glass elements?  Thankful for the third party repair shops.  Canon is still selling the original 70-200 2.8L non-IS even though they no longer support it. 

If it was made this century it won't have lead.  I have a killer sharp mid 1990's Mamiya-Sekor 45mm f/2.8 645 lens which is equivalent to about a 28mm f/1.7 on full frame that I use for night stuff adapted to my medium format cameras but I know if I ever break it, it can not be repaired since it is all lead glass...
 

by DChan on Sun Jul 07, 2019 11:04 pm
DChan
Forum Contributor
Posts: 1963
Joined: 09 Jan 2009
OntPhoto wrote:
Sun Camera is the shop I am using.  A part for the 70-200 2.8L non-IS is back-ordered.  Part may be coming from Canon Japan.



I'm curious: why do you still want to fix the old lens when you just bought a new, better replacement one?? You fix it to sell it??
 

by WJaekel on Mon Jul 08, 2019 11:51 am
User avatar
WJaekel
Forum Contributor
Posts: 560
Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Location: Germany
Member #:01354
Woodswalker wrote:
....It's simply a fact of life in this business. There's a danger in keeping gear too long. Manufacturers are on to the next big thing....

On the other hand, the price you can achieve for selling your used gear has become ridiculous at some point. I.e., the 600mm IS II is sold for around € 5500 to 5800 here, even if it' s in excellent condition and it's still serviced, of course. The 600mm vIII costs € 13000 and has the same optical quality though it weighs around 1kg less. That doesn't justify the huge loss of money for me and I think that many photogs are in the same position to keep their lenses longer instead of always upgrading to the newest gear - unless there's a huge benefit making up for the difference, at least. Of course, one's opinion and mileage can vary here and everybody has to decide if he needs to support that fall of prices in today's market. I still use my 300mm/f.2.8 IS 1 and also had the 500mm/f4 IS 1 for a long time without any issues. Both of them are not serviced anymore. If in fact there will be a failure, I'm confident to find a third party repair. If you totally crash the lens, it may be another story, though.

Wolfgang
 

by Woodswalker on Mon Jul 08, 2019 5:13 pm
Woodswalker
Forum Contributor
Posts: 430
Joined: 12 Apr 2008
Great glass is great glass. But I might get caught one of these days with not being able to repair my older 400 2.8. I've had to replace lens mounts a couple of times in the past 10 years. Hopefully wear-and-tear parts like lens mounts will be around for awhile longer.
 

by OntPhoto on Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:42 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
Woodswalker wrote:
Great glass is great glass. But I might get caught one of these days with not being able to repair my older 400 2.8. I've had to replace lens mounts a couple of times in the past 10 years. Hopefully wear-and-tear parts like lens mounts will be around for awhile longer.

Yes, great glass is great glass.  Regarding your mount, if it's not too expensive, maybe buy an extra part in case?
 

by OntPhoto on Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:48 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
DChan wrote:
OntPhoto wrote:
Sun Camera is the shop I am using.  A part for the 70-200 2.8L non-IS is back-ordered.  Part may be coming from Canon Japan.



I'm curious: why do you still want to fix the old lens when you just bought a new, better replacement one?? You fix it to sell it??

It came down to price point. The repair and parts were well within reason.  That lens new is still selling for over $1,600.  It's a lighter lens (compared to the IS version) and I may decide to take it out on some days, leave it in the trunk, etc. 
 

by OntPhoto on Sun Jul 14, 2019 5:55 pm
User avatar
OntPhoto
Forum Contributor
Posts: 6674
Joined: 09 Dec 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario. Canada.
WJaekel wrote:
Woodswalker wrote:
....It's simply a fact of life in this business. There's a danger in keeping gear too long. Manufacturers are on to the next big thing....

On the other hand, the price you can achieve for selling your used gear has become ridiculous at some point. I.e., the 600mm IS II is sold for around € 5500 to 5800 here, even if it' s in excellent condition and it's still serviced, of course. The 600mm vIII costs € 13000 and has the same optical quality though it weighs around 1kg less. That doesn't justify the huge loss of money for me and I think that many photogs are in the same position to keep their lenses longer instead of always upgrading to the newest gear - unless there's a huge benefit making up for the difference, at least. Of course, one's opinion and mileage can vary here and everybody has to decide if he needs to support that fall of prices in today's market. I still use my 300mm/f.2.8 IS 1 and also had the 500mm/f4 IS 1 for a long time without any issues. Both of them are not serviced anymore. If in fact there will be a failure, I'm confident to find a third party repair. If you totally crash the lens, it may be another story, though.

Wolfgang

I have gotten off the upgrade bandwagon a long time ago.  Kept the Canon 40D for about 6+ years until something really worthwhile came along, the 7D MK2. I am going to assume most of my older lenses are no longer being serviced by Canon.  For some reason I tend to hang onto things for way too long.  Still have the Canon 75-300 5.6 IS.  That is a lens I should have sold before it became unsellable.  A $700 museum piece which is why I maybe hung onto it for, you know, first ever Canon IS lens :-)  I bet it continues to take very nice photos but just not for what I would need it for.
 

by ChrisRoss on Mon Aug 19, 2019 1:15 am
ChrisRoss
Forum Contributor
Posts: 12875
Joined: 07 Sep 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
E.J. Peiker wrote:
There are third parties that will still repair most but not all of them.  One factor is availability of parts, the other is lead glass elements which I guess are both parts availability issues and the later is also a potential safety issue for those working on them.

This whole lead glass thing as an excuse not to work on a lens is a a bit ridiculous, people handle lead all the time lead weights for scuba diving, fishing sinkers etc.  Primary risk point for lead poisoning is ingestion, kids chewing on lead paint etc.   If you wash your hands after handling it, the risk is basically not there and for lead in glass, you are not going to get any lead on your hands during the course of any repair.  The lead in glass is not volatile and the risk comes from grinding it or leaching lead from the glass (like a lead crystal decanter, used to store your cognac). 

I can see why they don't make lead glass anymore, you have to grind it and make lead glass powder when figuring the lenses and also making the lead glass in the first place, where you melt lead glass, exposes people to significant risk of lead poisoning.  But for old lenses, the lead is locked inside the glass, the technician is not about to store his cognac in the lens and sip it while repairing it,  most of the time he will never contact anything but the front or rear element when he cleans it after finishing work.   The only reason I see for people not working on them is you can't get a replacement lens element if it is made with lead glass.   The big companies like Canon just made a global decision when they stopped using lead glass to not work on those lenses anymore of course that had nothing to with the fact that it would force you buy a replacement if it needed service.
Chris Ross
Sydney
Australia
http://www.aus-natural.com   Instagram: @ausnaturalimages  Now offering Fine Art printing Services
 

by E.J. Peiker on Mon Aug 19, 2019 8:35 am
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 83914
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
I should have written, "for those making the lead glass elements" rather than the word "them"
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by:  
14 posts | 
  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group