fbpixel
  
« Previous topic | Next topic »  
Reply to topic  
 First unread post  | 7 posts | 
by E.J. Peiker on Thu Jul 11, 2019 7:59 am
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 84080
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
Some serious glass here:
35mm f/1,2 Art
14-24mm f/2.8 Art

and a consumer "normal" lens:
45mm f/2.8

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/news/sigma-develops-trio-of-lenses-designed-for-full-frame-mirrorless-cameras
 

by Scott Fairbairn on Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:14 am
User avatar
Scott Fairbairn
Forum Contributor
Posts: 4538
Joined: 13 Jan 2005
That 14-24 interests me for astro work. They specifically mention it's ideal for astrophotography, which should mean no coma.
 

by E.J. Peiker on Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:31 am
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 84080
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
Scott Fairbairn wrote:
That 14-24 interests me for astro work. They specifically mention it's ideal for astrophotography, which should mean no coma.


Their 14mm f/1.8 is great for that and 1 1/3 stops faster...
 

by Scott Fairbairn on Thu Jul 11, 2019 10:26 am
User avatar
Scott Fairbairn
Forum Contributor
Posts: 4538
Joined: 13 Jan 2005
E.J. Peiker wrote:
Scott Fairbairn wrote:
That 14-24 interests me for astro work. They specifically mention it's ideal for astrophotography, which should mean no coma.


Their 14mm f/1.8 is great for that and 1 1/3 stops faster...




Doesn't it suffer from coma in the edges on full frame?
 

by E.J. Peiker on Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:06 am
User avatar
E.J. Peiker
Senior Technical Editor
Posts: 84080
Joined: 16 Aug 2003
Location: Arizona
Member #:00002
What super wide lens doesn't?  They all do at least to some extent.  I think it is a vastly overblown thing for virtually all artistic uses.  It's certainly a much smaller issue than the other totally overblown thing, the Sony star-eater effect.  Neither matter one bit for anything but scientific documentary photography.  That said, it's better than any zoom I've ever seen and having 1.3 stops extra allows you to either get shorter exposures, lower noise for the same exposure (aperture and exposure time), or stop down 1 1/3 stops for image quality...
 

by Scott Fairbairn on Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:58 am
User avatar
Scott Fairbairn
Forum Contributor
Posts: 4538
Joined: 13 Jan 2005
E.J. Peiker wrote:
What super wide lens doesn't?  They all do at least to some extent.  I think it is a vastly overblown thing for virtually all artistic uses.  It's certainly a much smaller issue than the other totally overblown thing, the Sony star-eater effect.  Neither matter one bit for anything but scientific documentary photography.  That said, it's better than any zoom I've ever seen and having 1.3 stops extra allows you to either get shorter exposures, lower noise for the same exposure (aperture and exposure time), or stop down 1 1/3 stops for image quality...




I agree. I've never used a camera lens that doesn't have it or color halos. That's what I was wondering about the 14-24mm since they specifically mention it's an ideal astro lens. The f1.8 would be awesome though.
 

by Jess Lee on Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:45 pm
User avatar
Jess Lee
Forum Contributor
Posts: 1289
Joined: 07 Dec 2003
Location: Idaho
Scott Fairbairn wrote:
E.J. Peiker wrote:
What super wide lens doesn't?  They all do at least to some extent.  I think it is a vastly overblown thing for virtually all artistic uses.  It's certainly a much smaller issue than the other totally overblown thing, the Sony star-eater effect.  Neither matter one bit for anything but scientific documentary photography.  That said, it's better than any zoom I've ever seen and having 1.3 stops extra allows you to either get shorter exposures, lower noise for the same exposure (aperture and exposure time), or stop down 1 1/3 stops for image quality...




I agree. I've never used a camera lens that doesn't have it or color halos. That's what I was wondering about the 14-24mm since they specifically mention it's an ideal astro lens. The f1.8 would be awesome though.



I have used the Sigma 14 f1.8 for aurora and Milky Way since its introduction and is is very good, but there are many newer products that will raise the bar. Some of the Nikon Z mount lens are exceptional. The Lawoa lenses are very good also. I was impressed with the 12mm f2.8 in the f mount and their new 15 mm f2 I tested for a couple of months this spring. All of the new lenses coming out with better designs allowed by mirrorless make it an exciting and expensive time for those of us who enjoy photographing the night sky. I am looking forward to the real world test on some of these.
Jess
Photos have a story to tell.
Photo Workshops

Western Images
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by:  
7 posts | 
  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group