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by Doug Brown on Thu Dec 08, 2011 8:41 am
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I'm considering buying an Epson 3880, but have been concerned about the slim pickings in 17x25 size. I posted a comment to that effect on the Moab forum, and to my surprise, within a couple of hours they posted a reply saying they'd give it a try in the next 4-6 weeks. I've never understood the 17x22 size in the context of modern digital SLRs. I think they're going to use Moab Entrada paper to start.
 

by E.J. Peiker on Thu Dec 08, 2011 9:59 am
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That is good news. In the meantime, the Red River offerings aren't bad and work and their profiles are reasonably accurate for that printer.
 

by Ron Day on Mon Dec 12, 2011 9:39 pm
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That's a great advance for Entrada users. I'll look forward to using it. Thanks.
 

by James McIntyre on Wed Dec 14, 2011 7:56 pm
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Doug:

That's very good news indeed. Moab Entrada is a favorite paper of renowned landscape photog Linde Waidhofer. She actually prepares her prints without an overmat and considers glazing optional: http://www.westerneye.com/prints/index.html

Be sure to view her superb Ebook on Patagonia: http://www.westerneye.com/books/index.html. It's a free download!

Thad Brown has written an interesting article about displaying prints with easy interchangeability: http://soloing.com/displaying-your-images/. He employs a Nielsen 17x 22 Style 5621 metal frame, which has a deepset slanted top. Thad points out the aspect ratio advantage of 17x25 frames and also that this size photo paper is available from InkJetArt and Hawk Mountain. Add in Red River and now Moab and we will have at least 4 different suppliers.

Afer considerable searching, I found that Frame Destination in Dallas, TX (http://www.framedestination.com/) supplies the N56 moulding at attractive prices. This frame is suitable for exhibitions. But also of interest are the complete ready-made 17x22 and 17x25 frames (Nielsen Style 2) that this company supplies without mat for less than $26.

I'm planning to try these frames with 17-inch-wide prints made with my Epson 3800.

Regards,
Jim
 

by Professional on Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:52 am
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Long time ago i didn't print with my Epson 3800, so i think this is the time for me to select some of my best work and start to print.
Well, i have Epson papers 17x22, but this paper lead me to much crops for my work, even with 17x25 i need crop but very slightly, so why they produced that size of paper then? if i don't crop my pics and resize it for 17" wide then the length come to 25.5" so how i can get that 25.5"? and how to crop for 17x25? I bought a roll from Arista of 17" or 16", i know my Epson don't take rolls, but i was thinking to send this roll pack for cutting to proper size, so what size i should cut it with, 25.5" or 25" or 26" or 30"?
Tareq Alhamrani
 

by Randy Mehoves on Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:23 am
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17x25 papers are made specifically for printing using the 16x24 format which is 35mm sensor (or 35mm film size) ratio. I think that leaving a border around the print instead of printing full size is better as you don't get ink over-spray in the printer or smudges at the end of the print.

Your concern that the 17x25 paper makes you crop slightly when you print full size brings up an interesting point, if you print full size and you frame the print are you not losing part of the image when you mat and frame (hence cropping)? When you mat and frame an image you need a certain amount of the paper to be present for the mat to "hold" it in place ( a lesser amount for dry mounted images). With 17x25 paper and a 16x24 image printed on it you lose very little of the image during the framing process.
 

by Professional on Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:26 pm
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Randy Mehoves wrote:
17x25 papers are made specifically for printing using the 16x24 format which is 35mm sensor (or 35mm film size) ratio. I think that leaving a border around the print instead of printing full size is better as you don't get ink over-spray in the printer or smudges at the end of the print.

Your concern that the 17x25 paper makes you crop slightly when you print full size brings up an interesting point, if you print full size and you frame the print are you not losing part of the image when you mat and frame (hence cropping)? When you mat and frame an image you need a certain amount of the paper to be present for the mat to "hold" it in place ( a lesser amount for dry mounted images). With 17x25 paper and a 16x24 image printed on it you lose very little of the image during the framing process.


True, but i also shoot with digital MF which is different than 35mm format size, sometimes i like to print 16x24 on that 17x25, so instead to crop the full frame image i just printing it full and have margins on larger size paper, for example i can print 16x24 on 17x25 paper or even 16x20 on 17x22 Epson paper, or send to lab for 20x30, they may print it on 24x36 so i can have enough borders for signature or title or framing it in mat.
Tareq Alhamrani
 

by Randy Mehoves on Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:56 pm
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What I wound up doing is buying several rolls of paper and canvas and then using a commercial type paper cutter, cut to the size sheets that I need. I generally like to allow at least 1/4 inch ( prefer 1/2 inch) of border all around.
 

by irvweiner on Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:10 am
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Randy, whose cutter did you purchase? My concern is cutting canvas 16-24 mils.
Purchasing and cutting roll paper/canvas can save 15-25% but the main advantage is selecting the size you choose with min waste. Rolled media may require de-curling depending on the media chosen.

irv weiner
 

by Randy Mehoves on Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:48 am
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Irv, a friend of mine has an old guillotine style paper cutter that I use very similar to this:

Image

It will cut through canvas and even mat board very easily

I have found the quickest, easiest way to get the curls out from sheets cut from a roll is to simply put them in a dry mount press for a couple seconds after cutting.
If you have a working relationship with a frame shop they may not even charge you.
 

by irvweiner on Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:16 am
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Randy, thanks for your quick reply. I have that 'exact cutter--15 in deep! Great on paper <15 in but shreds my smaller canvas sizes. Tried a Dahle 508 rotary cutter--again great on paper but useless on canvas. I been trying a Rotatrim 24 in cutter and it's perfect-cuts like butter thru all my media--but is expensive >$275. I will go for it-has been highly recommended on several sites but the price turned me off. I'll just have to cut back on my Starbucks lattes! In addition, I find a 15-25% savings using roll paper and cutting down to size-more important I no longer have sacrifice a large sheet of media for a smaller custom size.

Again, many thanks for ypur help---irv weiner
 

by Professional on Sat Jan 14, 2012 3:28 pm
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I would like to buy a cutter, i don't know how to cut my 17" roll papers, but i will think to buy it locally than online.
Tareq Alhamrani
 

by irvweiner on Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:15 pm
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The Rotatrim is produced in Great Britain, you should have no difficulty ordering direct from the UAE.
Their president's motto is: 'Our competition is our best advertiser'! I must agree.

I purchased the 24 in. Mastercut because 37.4 in. is the longest length my 3880 can handle--but the 36 in. model, which would actually cut to 37 (carefully, my 24 will do 25) is too costly for me, a serious but non-pro photographer.

good luck irv weiner
 

by Professional on Mon Jan 16, 2012 7:21 am
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Thank you!
Tareq Alhamrani
 

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