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Notre Dame de Paris (pre-fire)


Posted by Paul Skoczylas on Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:30 pm

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A sunset view of the west facade of Notre Dame, from back in 2017.

This is HDR, taken with a 24 TSE (Mk 2) on a Canon 5D2.  In case it's not obvious, there was also an ND filter used to get the shutter speed as long as possible -- so that people in the square would be blurred out as much as possible.

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by Cynthia Crawford on Tue Jul 09, 2019 5:14 am
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How lovely to see it in all it's pre-fire glory. Interesting to use the filter to blur out people. Makes me a little dizzy.:). Not sure I'd mind if they were clear. Anyway it's a fine shot in the sunset. Nice symmetry and pretty clouds.
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by Carol Clarke on Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:03 pm
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It certainly was a very striking piece of architecture, Paul, and this sunset view is rather a hint of what was to come with the fiery glow! I always think that it is expected to see crowds around these iconic buildings, so I wouldn't expect to see them blurred out...... but maybe that's just me.

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by Paul Skoczylas on Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:11 pm
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Carol Clarke wrote:
It certainly was a very striking piece of architecture, 


It still is!  There's actually nothing in this view that isn't still there.  Unfortunately, the whole square is now blocked off with construction fencing and police barricades, so getting this shot will be impossible for the next few years...  (Makes me wonder what will happen to the rats that were living on garbage in the square.  You don't see them at midday, but when I was taking this, there were many to be seen!)

I'm not a people person--so I wanted to blur them out as much as I could.  Even with the ND and the HDR, the longest exposure was only a minute or so, and some people just don't move in a minute.  At this time, visiting hours were over, so the lineup for the security screening was gone (it normally snaked across the whole square.)

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by Carol Clarke on Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:18 pm
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Paul Skoczylas wrote:
Carol Clarke wrote:
It certainly was a very striking piece of architecture, 


It still is!  There's actually nothing in this view that isn't still there.  Unfortunately, the whole square is now blocked off with construction fencing and police barricades, so getting this shot will be impossible for the next few years...  (Makes me wonder what will happen to the rats that were living on garbage in the square.  You don't see them at midday, but when I was taking this, there were many to be seen!)

I'm not a people person--so I wanted to blur them out as much as I could.  Even with the ND and the HDR, the longest exposure was only a minute or so, and some people just don't move in a minute.  At this time, visiting hours were over, so the lineup for the security screening was gone (it normally snaked across the whole square.)

-Paul



What a lovely picture you paint, Paul!  :)   I hope the rats are being provided with alternative cafe facilities.......  As for the fire destruction, maybe the papers were being over dramatic in showing what mainly seemed to be a gutted building and heaps of burned timbers.

I can see your thinking behind the blur now - I'm not a people person either when it comes to photography.

Carol.
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the world will know peace"....Jimi Hendrix.

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by Paul Skoczylas on Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:38 pm
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Carol Clarke wrote:
Paul Skoczylas wrote:
Carol Clarke wrote:
It certainly was a very striking piece of architecture, 


It still is!  There's actually nothing in this view that isn't still there.  Unfortunately, the whole square is now blocked off with construction fencing and police barricades, so getting this shot will be impossible for the next few years...  (Makes me wonder what will happen to the rats that were living on garbage in the square.  You don't see them at midday, but when I was taking this, there were many to be seen!)

I'm not a people person--so I wanted to blur them out as much as I could.  Even with the ND and the HDR, the longest exposure was only a minute or so, and some people just don't move in a minute.  At this time, visiting hours were over, so the lineup for the security screening was gone (it normally snaked across the whole square.)

-Paul



What a lovely picture you paint, Paul!  :)   I hope the rats are being provided with alternative cafe facilities.......  As for the fire destruction, maybe the papers were being over dramatic in showing what mainly seemed to be a gutted building and heaps of burned timbers.

I can see your thinking behind the blur now - I'm not a people person either when it comes to photography.

Carol.


The roof was totally gone, of course, but you can't see that here.  The woodwork in the towers was essentially all saved, so the towers should look as they did.  The fire didn't come out to the facade at all.  The stained glass was all (or almost all?) saved.  Inside the building, there were three (I think) places where the stone vaulting collapsed, allowing the burned roof timbers to fall to the floor.  That's probably what you saw in photos.  None of the collapsed vaulting was in the choir, so basically, the burned timbers just fell on the chairs in the nave and crossing.  Very messy, but not particularly tragic.  Obviously, it was bad, but it could have been much, much worse.
 

by Carol Clarke on Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:45 pm
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Paul Skoczylas wrote:
Carol Clarke wrote:
Paul Skoczylas wrote:
Carol Clarke wrote:
It certainly was a very striking piece of architecture, 


It still is!  There's actually nothing in this view that isn't still there.  Unfortunately, the whole square is now blocked off with construction fencing and police barricades, so getting this shot will be impossible for the next few years...  (Makes me wonder what will happen to the rats that were living on garbage in the square.  You don't see them at midday, but when I was taking this, there were many to be seen!)

I'm not a people person--so I wanted to blur them out as much as I could.  Even with the ND and the HDR, the longest exposure was only a minute or so, and some people just don't move in a minute.  At this time, visiting hours were over, so the lineup for the security screening was gone (it normally snaked across the whole square.)

-Paul



What a lovely picture you paint, Paul!  :)   I hope the rats are being provided with alternative cafe facilities.......  As for the fire destruction, maybe the papers were being over dramatic in showing what mainly seemed to be a gutted building and heaps of burned timbers.

I can see your thinking behind the blur now - I'm not a people person either when it comes to photography.

Carol.


The roof was totally gone, of course, but you can't see that here.  The woodwork in the towers was essentially all saved, so the towers should look as they did.  The fire didn't come out to the facade at all.  The stained glass was all (or almost all?) saved.  Inside the building, there were three (I think) places where the stone vaulting collapsed, allowing the burned roof timbers to fall to the floor.  That's probably what you saw in photos.  None of the collapsed vaulting was in the choir, so basically, the burned timbers just fell on the chairs in the nave and crossing.  Very messy, but not particularly tragic.  Obviously, it was bad, but it could have been much, much worse.


Very interesting and concise description, thanks Paul.

Carol.
Carol Clarke
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"When the power of love is greater than the love of power,
the world will know peace"....Jimi Hendrix.

NSN0067
 

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