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by signgrap on Mon Aug 15, 2022 11:14 am
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If you are interested in seeing some beautiful Astro Photos, take a look at Shortlisted entries for the 2022 Astronomy Photographer of the Year.
Here's a link: https://www.dpreview.com/news/9753645413/slideshow-shortlisted-entries-for-the-2022-astronomy-photographer-of-the-year 
Dick Ludwig
 

by E.J. Peiker on Mon Aug 15, 2022 1:20 pm
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A few really incredible shots - the ones that do not include earth in any way are especially compelling.
 

by Ed Cordes on Wed Aug 17, 2022 8:22 pm
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They are all amazing. The hours and hours of exposure time is unbelievable.
Remember, a little mild insanity keeps us healthy
 

by Brian Stirling on Tue Aug 30, 2022 6:57 pm
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It is quite amazing to think that the digital editing tools now available for astro image processing makes it possible for a backyard astronomer to produce images about on par with what was only possible from the top of a mountain and a $50M telescope just 30 years ago. The way planetary images are captured, using video, and then software sorts those frames into good/bad and then, using the good frames, they further divide the frame into smaller elements and then the software sorts through them to find the elements with the greatest detail, and then assembles the final image using the best elements that then get's processed for contrast etc.

Brian
 

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