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by SantaFeJoe on Thu May 20, 2021 10:43 pm
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An iPhone photo that is a once in a lifetime image. It’s an amazing shot.

https://laurarowe.smugmug.com/West-Texas-Storm/

https://twitter.com/lauralouu30/status/1394386482475929602

Here’s the story behind the image:

https://www.krqe.com/news/new-mexico/enmu-students-photo-of-storm-goes-viral/

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by TomWalker on Fri May 21, 2021 8:56 am
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I had a friend who is a meteorologist looks at this. While his comment may be more technical that I expected, his last point is excellent. 

“This is a low-precipitation (LP) supercell, which represents the least moist supercell within the supercell-spectrum.  

The spectrum, from greatest moisture content to lowest, is composed of the high-precipitation (HP) supercell, the classic supercell, and the LP supercell.  

LP supercells tend to form on the dry-line (a surface moisture discontinuity, with drier air to the west of the dry-line, and moister air east of it.

LPs do not generate much in the way of rainfall, but almost always produce large hail stones (baseball size and larger) that drop like bombs from the sky.  I lost many a windshield to LP supercells back in my storm chasing days.

The lowest part of the cloud reveals rotation perpendicular to the ground surface, which shows up quite conspicuously here in this photo, is known as a "wall cloud."  It is from the wall cloud area of the storm that tornadoes form.

LP supercells are not prolific tornado producers, but when they do generate them, they are incredibly photogenic; although generally weak in nature.

Most people don't believe these photos are real.  And while most of the photos are clearly edited, the morphology of the storm is not changed during post-processing.  That's the way they really look.”
 

by EGrav on Fri May 21, 2021 11:12 am
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Yeah, the cloud structure is real, but the colors.......?
 

by SantaFeJoe on Fri May 21, 2021 12:15 pm
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EGrav wrote:
Yeah, the cloud structure is real, but the colors.......?


Unknown, but even in B&W the image is powerful!

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by ChrisRoss on Sun Jun 27, 2021 8:52 pm
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Amazing looking storm, but she could have walked 50-100m down the road to get the powerlines out of the shot :)
Chris Ross
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http://www.aus-natural.com   Instagram: @ausnaturalimages  Now offering Fine Art printing Services
 

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