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by SantaFeJoe on Sat Jul 06, 2019 10:17 am
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SantaFeJoe
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This article on attaining sharp focus may be useful to some here who are just learning or desire sharper images than they are getting. I like John Gerlach’s photography and articles a lot.

https://www.gerlachnaturephoto.com/single-post/2019/06/28/Shoot-Sharp-Wildlife-Photos

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by DOglesby on Sun Jul 14, 2019 10:18 pm
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SantaFeJoe wrote:
This article on attaining sharp focus may be useful to some here who are just learning or desire sharper images than they are getting. I like John Gerlach’s photography and articles a lot.

https://www.gerlachnaturephoto.com/single-post/2019/06/28/Shoot-Sharp-Wildlife-Photos

Joe



Yeah, that was interesting. He's a big tripod fan. I haven't used a tripod for wildlife shooting in a while and my sharpness hasn't suffered in a way that is noticeable. I find tripods too restrictive to my shooting style. I like to be mobile and find I get many more shots with that flexibility. This is enabled by great high ISO full frame cameras, new long and light lenses (e.g., 200-500 Nikon, the upcoming 200-600 Sony) and high quality manufacturing (e.g., Sony's 1.4x is sharp enough on a 100-400 and gives a field of view of 840mm on an A7R III in crop mode). The downside, of course, is the need for a much higher shutter speed and higher ISO...but man, the high ISO capability of the Sony's are great so I'm happy as a clam. 
Cheers,
Doug
 

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