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by SantaFeJoe on Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:59 pm
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It’s becoming a problem that is ruining many locations by giving out the coordinates of special places:

https://fstoppers.com/originals/please-stop-tagging-locations-your-outdoor-photographs-291790

https://fstoppers.com/landscapes/clear-evidence-stop-geotagging-specific-locations-your-nature-photographs-social-300970

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by E.J. Peiker on Mon Nov 05, 2018 8:31 am
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I posted this on FB in response to a similar post.  I've pasted that post here.  I don't geotag my images but I have made the decision to be more vague on the location of where photos my photos were taken...

This is not far from where I live and I used to go there several times a year.  When I first started in the mid 1990's I could go to Horseshoe Bend (It was easy to miss the 5 car dirt parking area then), I would hike over the hill to the bend and literally be the only person there for hours on end, especially if it was during the week.  By the mid 2000's there might be 5 people there, by 2015 it was 100's.  Now the place is destroyed and there are thousands there every day.  The destruction, however, is more the fault of the NPS than it is the people as they decided to "develop" the area.  They have replaced the old trail over the hill that was too much work for about 60% of the population that eats over 3000 calories a day with a handicap accessible trail.  They have destroyed the rim with jackhammers and bulldozers and put in a platform and railings. It's a travesty.  My signature shot taken from a narrow V in the rim from the area no longer exists.  It's very upsetting to me and a travesty.  As the video said, it's not the only place like this.  All over the world this is happening.  Look at pretty much Iceland from the Snaefelsness Peninsula to Hofn.  I now go to places there in the night in summers because during the day it's a mess.  And now a similar thing is happening in the north and the east will soon follow.  There is example after example.  Partly, we photographers are to blame by posting stunning pictures of these places but the cell phone era, as the video says and things like Google Earth is even more at fault.
 

by SantaFeJoe on Mon Nov 05, 2018 11:05 am
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This thread talked a bit about it in September:

https://www.naturescapes.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=279707

Once the info is out there, a location is pretty much doomed in this day of easy travel and camera abundance. It’s really too bad for the outdoors and phoneography has multiplied the problem many fold. Bosque has been a prime example of overuse. It makes me sick to hear people complain about photographic conditions there, when  birds and wildlife should really be the only primary consideration and not photography.

Photographers may try to justify their cause by saying how much they add to the economy of the surrounding areas, but money should never even be a consideration over nature. Destroying natural areas like around Horseshoe Bend is a disgrace to nature.

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Wildflower-nut on Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:35 pm
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E.J. Peiker wrote:
I posted this on FB in response to a similar post.  I've pasted that post here.  I don't geotag my images but I have made the decision to be more vague on the location of where photos my photos were taken...

This is not far from where I live and I used to go there several times a year.  When I first started in the mid 1990's I could go to Horseshoe Bend (It was easy to miss the 5 car dirt parking area then), I would hike over the hill to the bend and literally be the only person there for hours on end, especially if it was during the week.  By the mid 2000's there might be 5 people there, by 2015 it was 100's.  Now the place is destroyed and there are thousands there every day.  The destruction, however, is more the fault of the NPS than it is the people as they decided to "develop" the area.  They have replaced the old trail over the hill that was too much work for about 60% of the population that eats over 3000 calories a day with a handicap accessible trail.  They have destroyed the rim with jackhammers and bulldozers and put in a platform and railings. It's a travesty.  My signature shot taken from a narrow V in the rim from the area no longer exists.  It's very upsetting to me and a travesty.  As the video said, it's not the only place like this.  All over the world this is happening.  Look at pretty much Iceland from the Snaefelsness Peninsula to Hofn.  I now go to places there in the night in summers because during the day it's a mess.  And now a similar thing is happening in the north and the east will soon follow.  There is example after example.  Partly, we photographers are to blame by posting stunning pictures of these places but the cell phone era, as the video says and things like Google Earth is even more at fault.




I'm glad to have lived during the time I lived in.  So many of the things I did during my life are now over crowded, no longer exist, require lottery permits, or are prohibited.  All indications are that it is not going to get better. 
 

by SantaFeJoe on Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:55 pm
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Basically the same story here:

https://petapixel.com/2018/11/05/how-geotagged-photos-are-harming-natural-landmarks/

When are they going to build a skywalk there??? The numbers of visitors is staggering.

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Jeff Colburn on Tue Nov 06, 2018 2:26 pm
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Hi,

Overcrowding and vandalism is a problem. Fortunately, my camera doesn't do geotagging, but if it did, I would turn it off.

I don't mind showing Native American ruins, pictographs, petroglyphs and other sensitive places, but I don't tell where they are if I think people will go there and damage them. We had problems last year in northern Arizona with graffiti (spray paint) damaging several places.

Crowds usually aren't a problem because of where I go, but we do make several trips to the Grand Canyon every year. The crowds used to be manageable, but now I have to go in off-season, or move well away from the main parking area to get away from large crowds.

Oh well, the 7,200,000,000 people on this dust ball have to be somewhere. I just wish it was in front of my lens.

Have Fun,
Jeff
Fine Art Prints and Stock Photography of Arizona www.JeffColburn.com See my ebooks in the NatureScapes Store 25 Places To Sell Your Photographs And Photography Skills and The Vanishing Old West - Jerome
 

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