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by OntPhoto on Tue May 16, 2017 12:11 am
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After a century, scientists are getting a better understanding of the elusive great gray owls that live in California's Sierra Nevada.

http://www.audubon.org/magazine/fall-2016/after-100-years-scientists-are-finally-starting
 

by david fletcher on Wed May 17, 2017 1:14 pm
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really interesting article. the depth and knowledge and effort over so many years, provides some hope. of interest to me personally...

"Medley and his colleagues now know the answer to Grinnell’s question. The owl that gazed across the meadow was an Ice Age remnant, a northern bird that proved adaptable enough to survive in tiny numbers in California’s more temperate climate. Now the biologists believe they have the tools to secure the birds’ future here. "

remarkable. thanks for your effort and insight
Make your life spectacular!
 

by OntPhoto on Thu May 18, 2017 6:42 am
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david fletcher wrote:
really interesting article.  the depth and knowledge and effort over so many years, provides some hope.   of interest to me personally...

"Medley and his colleagues now know the answer to Grinnell’s question. The owl that gazed across the meadow was an Ice Age remnant, a northern bird that proved adaptable enough to survive in tiny numbers in California’s more temperate climate. Now the biologists believe they have the tools to secure the birds’ future here.  "

remarkable.  thanks for your effort and insight

It's interesting how they did things back then, shooting the first 2 great gray owls they ever saw in order to study them.  The first owl was still alive after being shot and the second one was a kill when it responded to the calls of the first.  It was the mindset back then when you had to hunt for your own food.
 

by Paul Fusco on Thu May 18, 2017 11:14 am
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OntPhoto wrote:
It's interesting how they did things back then, shooting the first 2 great gray owls they ever saw in order to study them.  The first owl was still alive after being shot and the second one was a kill when it responded to the calls of the first.  It was the mindset back then when you had to hunt for your own food.


It was the mindset when there was very little regard for conservation. And, that pervasive mindset was a major reason that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed in the U.S. The Act played a big role in changing that mindset.
Today, even researchers are regulated and have to have a permit to shoot.

Paul
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NSN Portfolio
http://www.naturescapes.net/portfolios/ ... ?cat=10317
 

by DOglesby on Fri May 19, 2017 1:46 pm
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OntPhoto wrote:
After a century, scientists are getting a better understanding of the elusive great gray owls that live in California's Sierra Nevada.

http://www.audubon.org/magazine/fall-2016/after-100-years-scientists-are-finally-starting




Great read.  Thanks for posting this.
Cheers,
Doug
 

by OntPhoto on Fri May 19, 2017 9:46 pm
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It is a great read isn't it?  Here's something I didn't know and was brought up in the article.  The West Nile virus killed all 27 captive Great Gray Owls at The Owl Foundation bird-rehabilitation facility in Ontario, Canada.  I remember the scare with the West Nile virus and on the lookout for dead crows dropping out of the sky.

And this observation is fascinating and educational.  Expands my understanding of the bird and something I had no idea about. "....Great Gray Owls, they see you from a long ways away and they will flush....”  This is a behaviour I have not observed when they irrupt into the local and Quebec area.  Quite the opposite as they are known to be cooperative birds.  Makes me wonder why and what are the circumstances for it to behave as described.
 

by Mike in O on Sat May 20, 2017 11:38 pm
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Our GGO's if they are high up in the canopy will quietly move on but if they are hunting will lock onto the ground and will not move off their perch (usually head high off the ground).
 

by OntPhoto on Mon May 29, 2017 5:47 pm
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Mike in O wrote:
Our GGO's if they are high up in the canopy will quietly move on but if they are hunting will lock onto the ground and will not move off their perch (usually head high off the ground).

They have their priority, food. 

The spring following a big irruption winter may see the odd lingering great gray owl in eastern Ontario.  Someone actually reported one last week not too far from Ottawa in Lanark County (photo included, so this was not some mistaken identification).  A number of years ago following an irruption winter, a pair nested near Ottawa in the Fitzroy Harbour area.  I'd love to see these owls outside of the winter months so you are very fortunate to have that opportunity.

Update.
Someone else found a great gray owl across the river on the Quebec side (I assume). Would not surprise me if there are a couple more hanging around. 
 

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