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by SantaFeJoe on Sat Feb 02, 2019 5:57 pm
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This story makes it sound like Kodak may not make it for long. Part of it is from a Kodak CEO.

https://www.thephoblographer.com/2019/02/02/reports-state-that-kodak-alaris-is-looking-to-sell-assets/

It’s too bad if it works out that way, since film and chemical availability is not great at the moment, from what I’ve been reading.

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Wildflower-nut on Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:48 pm
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Very sad. They were such a great company.
 

by Swissblad on Sun Feb 03, 2019 1:25 am
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The closure of Tetenal - a key chemicals provider - is not helping either.....

https://www.dpreview.com/news/0757371292/photo-chemistry-manufacturer-and-supplier-tetenal-europe-faces-closure
 

by SantaFeJoe on Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:05 am
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Interesting article on Kodak:

https://petapixel.com/2019/02/02/why-kodak-willingly-ignored-the-future-of-photography/

And how they actually were instrumental in developing the first digital camera, which eventually led to their own demise:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_camera

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Brian Stirling on Mon Feb 04, 2019 1:54 pm
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When the automobile came along the industry that supported the horse and buggy era was done for and now digital is finally driving a nail into film's coffin. It is somewhat ironic, however, that Kodak played an important role in creating the very thing that killed them.

There are some art-types, particularly from the younger generation, that are forsaking digital and shooting exclusively with film because of the look I guess. There are not enough of them to save film.

With each passing generation digital improves the DR and increases in resolution are driving improvement in lenses that would not be noticeable or needed with film but those improvements are making photography more expensive even as we no longer need to spend money on film or processing.


Brian
 

by SantaFeJoe on Mon Feb 04, 2019 2:43 pm
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Brian Stirling wrote:
With each passing generation digital improves the DR and increases in resolution are driving improvement in lenses that would not be noticeable or needed with film but those improvements are making photography more expensive even as we no longer need to spend money on film or processing.


Brian

I think the most important thing about digital, ar least regarding wildlife photography, is the availability of high ISO. That was totally impossible with film, so you were highly limited as far as low light stop motion photography was concerned. I am especially thankful for that change. Not having the expense of film and devoping is also a major plus. It is sad to see Kodak fade, though, as it is almost like losing a long time partner that was a cornerstone of photography for so long. I’d love to know what the future holds for digital in twenty years. Will it also be replaced by a new technology? Maybe images that need no PP due to new in-camera AI. That’s one thing I did like about film and would be so thankful for in digital! That would leave more time to spend in the field.

Joe
Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.  -Pablo Picasso
 

by Jeff Colburn on Tue Feb 05, 2019 12:32 pm
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Wow, it's hard to imagine a world without Kodak.

Have Fun,
Jeff
Fine Art Prints and Stock Photography of Arizona www.JeffColburn.com See my ebooks in the NatureScapes Store 25 Places To Sell Your Photographs And Photography Skills and The Vanishing Old West - Jerome
 

by Brian Stirling on Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:43 pm
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Joe, when I look out a bit I see the same trends continuing for a while, but at some point increasing resolution will provide no advantage except when you can use a nearly wide open aperture and for that you're looking at a FOV where everything of interest is at nearly the same DOF -- there are some applications where that's feasible, but for general photography and in particular landscape photography operating wider than f/4 is not really the hot setup most of the time. So, I do see the resolution game coming to an end in the near future -- lenses are now so out of range expensive that the game can't continue forever.

Mirrorless, of course, will be the major effort over the next decade and one would hope new sensor designs that eliminate or limit rolling shutter come along. I also see greater connectivity and the ability to control all a cameras functions remotely, including zoom, along with panning/tilting mounts that can be programmed. So, in addition to the cameras and lenses I see the mounts being an area of development for automatic and remote tracking and astro work.


Brian
 

by Primus on Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:34 am
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Disruptive technologies are only increasing and history is replete with examples of how big a societal change they are capable of.

Here is Tony Seba's somewhat lengthy but very interesting talk on this, illustrates with some compelling examples and arguments even though it comes across as hyperbole at times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox5LtxqQNHw

From the photography perspective, I suspect smartphone and small sensor cameras will continue to converge until there is no more independent cameras of this kind. All we will be left with is enthusiasts and professionals toting high resolution, MF level sensors in compact mirrorless bodies with superhigh resolution lenses to go along. This may well become a niche and therefore more expensive than at present.

But, hey, what do I know :-)

Pradeep
 

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